Fashion Photography

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by Diddy2theJJ, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. Diddy2theJJ

    Diddy2theJJ TPF Noob!

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    Hey all, the company I work for is thinking about putting in a bid for a fashion shoot for a pretty large clothing company.

    I don't know any specifics about how many clothing changes or if it's going to be in a studio setting our outdoors. So there are lots of variables.

    But, they are asking me if I can do this, and I've never done any sort of a shoot like a fashion shoot. I've done alot of commercial work like food items for menus, and various websites. I've done a few portraits of kids, adults, and senior portraits as well.

    I guess what I'm asking is, what sort of things do I need to prepare for? I would need people for makeup. I would need people to help out with lights etc and maybe a fan for the hair if we went that route.

    Any tips or advice you guys could give me?
     
  2. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Start with a concept and a look as far as lighting and style go. Hire models and a MUA. Do some tests before the big day.

    The hardest part for me is the direction of the models. I use the constantly talking with them technique. I checked your book and you have some great work. Your tech and eye are good. Do not be intimidated. Have a vision and take charge.

    Love & Bass
     
  3. burnws6

    burnws6 TPF Noob!

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    Organization is key. For stuff like this, you need to sit down with paper and pad, and go and detail the **** out of every scenario every possibility and anything and everything from make up, to weather, to amount, to budget...god...I can't tell you how many times I wish I planned more. Write write write!
     
  4. Look for models that have some "moves", don't just look at the faces. All humans are drawn to faces, but you will want to evaluate if the models have images in their portfolio with good poses and interesting full-body images.

    The 18-85 will be great if you're just shooting torso. If you're shooting full body you will want some distance in the studio. I worry that the 70-200 is too long on the 7D... can you rent a 1Ds for the day? Great sync speed on that thing...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 9, 2010
  5. windcoastphotography

    windcoastphotography TPF Noob!

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    Organization is the key! My first fashion shoot, I was really nervous, but I took it like any other payed shoot. I planned ahead, make sure you have all equipment, a solid concept and plan for how the shoot will go down. Writing it all down in a timeline helps me, make sure you have an assistant to help with lights and general work. If you know what clothing you will be putting on the model, make sure you pick your favorites and put those at the front of the rack. I found that built my confidence, and when I got to the ugly designer stuff it made me think of different angles to make it look good. Another thing that can be very helpful is hiring a model and spending the day taking as many pictures as you can, find your angles! It is just like any other type of photography, you need to find your angles that you can get into the groove with. Sure you will have some photos that will look similar, but its better that getting a bad photo! But the biggest thing when working with models is positive encouragement. They know the positions they look good in, if they are experienced. Always say something positive after every couple of photos, like "gorgeous" or "looking great", let them know what is working and what needs to be done to make things better. You have to develop a relationship with them, communicate, don't just take pictures. Good music helps me think, but make sure it is something that everyone likes, it kinda sucks if you play country and you have a bunch of rock people in the building! Just act natural, you will do fine! It will be way easier that you think once you get your footing. Take your time and make sure you breathe!


    Always take a photo for yourself, even if it is outside the scope of the job. You have to take pictures for you wallet, but you have to take "photographs" for the soul.
     
  6. inTempus

    inTempus TPF Noob!

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    Why don't you sign up with Model Mayhem (Where Professional Models Meet Model Photographers - ModelMayhem) and arrange a few free model shoots? This will give you some quick experience. It's a great resource for novices looking to break into the field. Later, you can use the site to put out "casting calls" for models and make-up artists (MUA's) for professional shoots. Of course you can always reach out to an agency for your commercial shoots too, which will likely cost you more but the models will be more consistent in their abilities.
     
  7. Diddy2theJJ

    Diddy2theJJ TPF Noob!

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    Great suggestions guys! I can see that planning and pre-preparation are two of the key things here. I'll talk with the salesperson and account manager and see if they can get more information from the client before we move forward.

    I really hope we get this because I think it would be a really fun shoot to be a part of and would make a great addition to my portfolio.

    Craig, I appreciate the comments on my book as well.

    Iron Flatline, I'm not sure what you mean about the 70-200 and the 7D's sync speed. Could you please explain that?

    Thanks again.
     
  8. No, the sync speed is not what I'm worried about, though I mentioned it because in another thread I praised the 1Ds for it's ability to shoot HSS.

    What I meant was: I shoot with a 70-200 on a full frame Canon in a big studio, and sometimes I'm still not far enough back. The 7D is a cropped sensor, right? You might need a wider lens, but I see you have that 15-85, that should work.
     
  9. kkamin

    kkamin TPF Noob!

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    I just thought I should mention, since I believe no one has yet, that you need a wardrobe stylist. As we know, fashion shoots are about selling clothes, and the wardrobe stylist will make sure the clothes look right on the model, that the clothes themselves look right, will have ideas for accessories, and will do things you could never think of (it's their job). If I had to choose between a wardrobe stylist and a make-up artist for a fashion shoot, I would take wardrobe. It is exponentially easier to add make-up in PS, than it is to try to restructure an entire outfit.
     
  10. kpeterson

    kpeterson TPF Noob!

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    Hi,

    Working in fashion photography, there is obviously a team of hair stylists, makeup artists, and stylists. However, you should always open to suggestions, and ideas, and love to see what others can bring to the table. And here you already have got some good suggestion to get start.
     
  11. andrespefia3

    andrespefia3 TPF Noob!

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    A studio is an ideal place to perform a fashion shoot because photographers can easily control lighting and stabilise conditions. If you are shooting in a studio environment remember to meter all areas of the scene to avoid unwanted shadows and the use of a separate light meter rather than the one in your camera, will offer a more accurate reading.
    Getting the right location is important if you want to convey a narrative within your shot. For example if the clothing and beauty styling are edgy, hard or provocative you may want to consider an urban setting , alternatively for spring, summer and natural fashions find a rural environment like: a field, meadow, beach, woodland or river bank.
     

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