Fashion shoot

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by BrittanyPagePhotography, Sep 12, 2005.

  1. BrittanyPagePhotography

    BrittanyPagePhotography TPF Noob!

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    Im new to this forum, go ahead give me all your criticism... i am a college student studying photography and would love other opinions. :)

    One thing that bothers me about these pictures is the shadow.

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  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    It's hard to critique more than one image at a time, and it helps to know what you were using and what you were trying to achieve. I think the guidelines for the critique section are in a sticky thread at the top...

    As for the shadows, you're right...it would look better without them IMHO.
     
  3. BrittanyPagePhotography

    BrittanyPagePhotography TPF Noob!

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    Nikon D70 was used with Flash. The exposure I cant quite re-call though. These are just some photo's I had to take for a fashion shoot at school and wanted to know what people think of them. I need to pick one of the two.

    Yes, and I re-read them. It says one picture unless you are trying to compare them. Like I said im new to this forum... and i apologize.
     
  4. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

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    Welcome to TPF! The shadows are definitely distracting, and using a flash directly vs. bouncing or diffusing is usually not advised. The poses are pretty static and don't really hold my attention for long. What kind of access to lighting/studio equipment do you have? In general, for portrait/glamour photography you want a good lighting ratio, use a strobe to provide most of the light and another to fill in the shadows. It creates greater depth to your portraits. It's not a bad first attempt, and I think you can already see areas that you can improve in which is great! Keep trying, try using nautral light, try bouncing your flash if it's off camera and try experimenting with reflectors as well. Also, visit your library and look through glamour photography books, read Vogue or Vanity Fair and pay close attention to the lighting and posing of the models.

    Again, welcome and I look forward to seeing more of your work :D
     
  5. 303villain

    303villain TPF Noob!

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    i totally agree with alison, the static poses kind of detract from the images, but they are a very good start! a fill light would help out tremendously with the shadow, and another thing is, direct light isnt very flattering to skin tones, if you do it to the side, the shading on one side will be excellent! if you dont hae access to studio lights do what i did, get creative and build one out of flash lights, lamps, what have you, it will not be the greatest, but its a start! look forward to seeing more!
     
  6. eydryan

    eydryan TPF Noob!

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    personally i am not so distracted by the shadows as the lack of skintones the flash produces. if i were to choose one with editing software it would be the bottom (u know, warmify it a bit) otherwise top. on the other hand, the pose is quite expressionless, maybe a smile would have helped. try it next time, smile at her and she will probably smile at you. or frown :)

    also, in such photos try to elevate your angle, use a shallower depth of view and maybe a longer lens, to isolate just the face. Now that is of course if you want a portrait. if you want to get the clothes right i recommend almost the same thing but get a tripod and also kill the flash.

    Or get a slave unit and bounce it off something (wall, reflector, etc) so the light is softer and more diffuse and thus creates less of a drop shadow (or theoretically none at all)
     
  7. phat1985

    phat1985 TPF Noob!

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    I kind of distracting, because she so cute... can you introduce her to me?
     
  8. elsapo

    elsapo TPF Noob!

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    I think the most problematic thing here, as someone pointed out, is the pose. No, the shadow isn't good, but it stands out because the pose is just so bland. You're not sure what to look at -- sunglasses? girl? earrings? necklace?

    A more energetic/inspired pose would probably do a lot to distract away from those shadows. Of course, if you're re-shooting, you can just fix both...

    These look like an odd cross between headshots and product shots.
     
  9. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Welcome!

    Yeah what they said. I will add that the farther away from the background the less of a shadow it creates
     
  10. dannygirl

    dannygirl TPF Noob!

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    It's not your camera but your model that causing the picture to be wrong.
     

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