fiber base optimum processing...

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by ambrogea, Aug 29, 2011.

  1. ambrogea

    ambrogea New Member

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    Hi all,
    just got a quick question here:
    printing BW FB paper, for optimum permanence ( as ilford mention on their files) , is 1 fix bath really enough ?( followed by wash, rince aid and final wash)?
    would it be safer to go with 2 fix bath with different ratio on both? ( ilford recomend on another version 1st fix bath @ 1+4 with rapid fixer and second @ 1+9 ...)
    thanks for the help.
     
  2. Helen B

    Helen B New Member

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    Starting in 1975, because that's when I first saw the method proposed for archival processing, I have used two-bath fixing for FB papers (I don't use RC). There's no doubt that one-bath fixing is perfectly capable of archival results, but two-bath gives you a big margin of safety, and it uses less fixer overall (for the same condition of the discarded fixer - you discard the first bath only then swap the second to the first and make new second).

    I would not use a lower dilution in the second bath because that means you can't use the second bath as the first bath when a new second bath is made.

    If you use two-bath fixing with a neutral or alkaline rapid fix there is no need for rinse aid - in fact any rapid fix is easier to wash out than standard fix. If fixing is truly complete, washing is easier. That means that all the silver complexes made during the fixing process, not just the silver halides, have been converted to easily soluble compounds.

    Best,
    Helen
     
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  3. ann

    ann Well-Known Member

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    :thumbup: plus when i am printing to sell i count the number of images based on Ilford's recommendation.
     
  4. ambrogea

    ambrogea New Member

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    Thanks Helen,
    i will follow your advice on that, i guess if you have 2 fix bath at same ratio dilution, you do equal time for both.
    so for how long do you wash your print without washaid?
    cheers
    Franck
     
  5. Robert_Maxey

    Robert_Maxey New Member

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    Use properly mixed developers, properly mixed stop bath, and properly mixed fixer. Some "experts" advise people to use two baths, but one will do it, as long as you do not exhaust the chemicals. That said, do what your manufacturer says. Or ignore that and do what is given below. Smiley!

    Do not mix part of the package. You must always mix the entire batch because chemicals settle and you will have issues.

    I've always used one fixer bath and Kodak test strips or chemicals to test for residual silver. Kodak's residual silver test solution works wonders, but sadly, it is likely no more. You can find the formulas on the web. Our fixer trays were about four feet square and five inches deep, so we got allot of mileage. I kept track of my chemical use and either replenished or mixed a new batch.

    That said, occasionally I would use two fixer baths due to volume or type of materials being processed.

    Sp watch for exhaustion and keep track of how many prints you run through your chemicals. Fixer is cheap so replace it as needed.

    Carefully wash for the required time and use hypo clear. Again, a silver test will tell you how effective your workflow is.

    And also remember, if you become lazy now, The Museum of Modern Art might have to remove your images from display because of blotches and other problems. Problems with sloppy processing do not immediately show up.

    Nothing to it
     

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