Film and Digital compared

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by neea, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. neea

    neea TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2006
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Ok. So I got my digital camera to quickly and more easily learn how to shoot in full manual mode all the time.

    Can I transfer settings from my digital camera to film and get the same or similar results?
    example: shooting at 1/200 and f5.0 at 100 ISO
    Or would I have to compensate somehow?

    Hope this makes sense.

    Thanx
     
  2. TBaraki

    TBaraki TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    718
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Edmonton, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The exposure will be the same: one doesn't buy a light meter for digital use and another for film use.

    My digital body allows for shutter and aperture adjustment in third stops. All three of my film cameras will only adjust in whole stops so, depending on what settings you have deemed appropriate on your digital there, may be a slight adjustment just to agree with the film body's adjustment scale.
     
  3. neea

    neea TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2006
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Good point. I don't know why I never thought of that before. Maybe because I've yet to venture into the world of buying a light meter :)
     
  4. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    digital is quite similar to slide film like velvia in terms of dynamical range. with slide film being a bit more forgiving with respect to the highlights and shadows. So if you get exposure OK-ish with digital, the same exposure will be very good with slide film ... and if you look at negative film things are even more on the safe side.

    however, the other way round does not work that well, if you get the exposure corect for negative film, and the scene contains more stops in brightness difference than digital can handle, then you will blow out some highlights and/or shadows.
     
  5. neea

    neea TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2006
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit

    Hmm Thanx alot for your help! :hugs:
     
  6. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Yes it depends on the film as Alex said. The difference is exposing for the highlights in digital and slide film, vs exposing for the shadows in negatives.
     
  7. Bobby Ironsights

    Bobby Ironsights TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2006
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Thunder Bay, ON, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit

    Jesus! What kind of film camera are you going to be using that doesn't have an onboard ttl light meter???

    Wooden Field Camera? Camera Obscura?:shock:
     
  8. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Messages:
    4,889
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    S.E. Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit

    Just about any 35mm up until the mid sixties. I still shoot for fun a 1966 Nikon F and a few other similar Nikon 35's. My 1996 Hasselblad has no internal meter either. A lot of cameras up through the 70's have CDS cell light meters that don't function anymore or are off several stops. And I verify exposure with a incident light meter very often with my current cameras even though the D1X and F5 have outstanding matrix meters. Measuring the light falling on the subject is much more accurate than the light reflected back to the camera. Almost all studio work is measured manually in this manner. In my kit I always have a Sekonic and Gossin digital flash/light meters. I prefer the Sekonic when using off camera strobes, and the Gossen for ambient light metering.
     
  9. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    well, I myself started in photography with a 35mm camera without a light meter .. and I am not that old you know ;)
     
  10. chris_arnet

    chris_arnet TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2007
    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    maybe a Canon T50 from 1985 like me lol. oh wait, i forgot, it adjusts shutter speed for me...:confused:

    anyway, as long as you realize that your film ISO/ASA is the film, not JUST the dial, your good to go. the exposure transfers over.
     
  11. (Ghastly) Krueger

    (Ghastly) Krueger TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,393
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lost between tomorrow and yesterday
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Also bear in mind the crop factor due to sensor size. It affects DOF. (Unless your digital has full sized sensor, of course)
     
  12. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,523
    Likes Received:
    344
    Location:
    North New Jersey, United States of America
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    heheehe.... some of us have whole collections of camera's without a light meter. (in fact.. a lot of cameras that have even less..)

    no.. I'm not that old either...
     

Share This Page