Film Discussion

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ShutteredEye, Mar 21, 2005.

  1. ShutteredEye

    ShutteredEye TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,411
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    Arlington, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    For those of you out there that still use film, can we have a discussion about different film brands and types?

    I plan on shooting our engagement photo's relatively soon and would like to ensure I use top quality film as these are shots we will want to keep for the rest of our lives.

    I am interested specifically high end 35mm color and b&w print films

    and high end 120/240 color and b&w films.

    I looked at the different offerings on B&H but the number of brands and types were a tad overwhelming.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    You'll find as many opinions here as there are brands.

    You are just as likely to get poor results from an expensive roll as a cheap roll if you are not familiar with the film. More important than what brand you choose is to stick with a single film until you get to know it. Then you can more accurately assess which film you get the best results with.

    I like to use Fuji NPS 160 and NPH 400 color neg film in both 35mm and 120/220. But I also get great results with plain old Kodak Gold 200, which is usually available for half the price (or less) than a roll of NPH.

    I've been using Arista Pro 125 and 400 (BW neg film in 35mm, 120, and 4x5) for a while now, and it works well for me. It's supposedly re-labeled Ilford FP4 and HP5; I chose it because it was cheap so I could afford to shoot lots of it.
     
  3. Mumfandc

    Mumfandc TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New York City, Chelsea
    Get Fuji NPH 400 rated @ 320. I like how it's not too contrasty and it seems to have a nice "dimension" to it. Colors are very natural, and (esp. w/120) it's very smooth. And I think it scans well too.

    Then there's Reala...
     
  4. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2,689
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Northeastern University, originally from Philly
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I love Fuji Superia Reala 100. It's very sharp and has lifelike colors. Although I must admit my film experience is somewhat limited, I have been very pleased with what I have gotten out of the rolls I have taken of SR.
     
  5. Happy Medium

    Happy Medium TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    League City, Texas
    I've used Kodak 400TX and TMAX 100 Black & White print films. 400TX dissapointed me somewhat, but i've found that the high sharpness and fine grain in TMAX 100 film produces excellent results, especially in medium format applications. Congratulations on your engagement!
     
  6. ckshen

    ckshen TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Berkeley, US
    are you shooting it indoors? i heard, though i never tried it myself, that Fuji Astia 100 is a good choice for portraits and gives very good skin tone. Sharp and fine grained film, though it is a slide film. But you probably aren't interested in getting into the whole discussion of slide vs print.

    Since you are shooting engagement photos, I'd say get the sharpest and finest grained film there are available so you can enlarge it without the grains showing.

    btw, how you gonna know if you are posing the right way if you are the one shooting?
     
  7. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2003
    Messages:
    25,303
    Likes Received:
    2,081
    Location:
    In the mental ward of this forum
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I like TMax 100 and Tri-X 320 for B&W. The Ilford ksmattfish mentioned is also very nice. I only shoot slide color film, so can't offer up anything for color print film. :)
     
  8. jasonmac

    jasonmac TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    For colour Fuji NPS 160 and NPH 400 is a pretty classic combination. This was used at my wedding and we were very happy with the results.
    Make sure you find a good lab as well. My local lab prints Superia very well, but NPS not so well. I take my NPS to a better quality lab.
    For B+W, Ilford films are nice. For portraits, go with the Plus range of films. The Delta range is better for landscapes IMHO.
     
  9. jasonmac

    jasonmac TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    I've also seen the following quote from David Carper (ILFORD Technical Service) elsewhere. I haven't tried this film myself.

     
  10. ShutteredEye

    ShutteredEye TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,411
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    Arlington, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks for the info so far folks.
     
  11. KizaHood

    KizaHood TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2005
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Serbia
    As Jasonmac noticed, the lab is very important too! Be sure to match your film of choice with their processing equipment of choice. I develop all my films at the lab that uses Fuji processes only (films developed in Fuji chemistry, on Fuji machines, later printed on Fuji paper), so I get the best results when using Fuji films!
     
  12. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    London
    Fuji Reala 100 and Kodak T-Max 400 are my personal favourites. T-Max gives a flattering grainy B&W image and Reala is great at accurate colour rendition to avoid any nasty red problems. A backup point-and-shoot or fully-manual body which take the same film (for the inevitable battery failures) is a good idea.
     

Share This Page