Film grain question

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by StreetShark, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. StreetShark

    StreetShark TPF Noob!

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    I have a old Canon FTb that was given to me. I am completely new to film photography and I was wondering if the pictures were so grainy because the camera is so old or because of something I did. Here are a few shots all shot with ISO 400 film at shutter speeds between 250 and 1000. Also these were taken before I really knew any thing about photography and I forget what apertures I used. Also no flash was used in any of the pictures.

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  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Your problem appears to be two-fold. First, for the most part, these are a mite underexposed, and this exposure tends to show up as film grain.

    You also used a faster speed film, with an ISO of 400 - faster film WILL have more grain showing. If you'd like less grain, stick to 100 speed films. Bracket your exposures and take notes of each frame until you get a feel for better exposure.

    They're not that far off - try again!
     
  3. StreetShark

    StreetShark TPF Noob!

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    Ok thanks. What is the average quality of the images from one of these old cameras?
     
  4. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    There is no such thing as average quality with any camera that has interchangeable lenses... it all depends on the lens used and of course the film. Assuming you are using a standard 50mm Canon prime and good consumer film it should be capable of producing some great images.

    P.s. I assume that by 'quality' you don't just mean grain; see Alex's post below...
     
  5. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    your grain depends on exposure, ISO of the film and on the type of film .. a fine grain pro film will have less grain than a consumer grade film

    it does not depend on the camera/lens
     
  6. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    Oh and it also depends on how the film is processed. But I'm not convinced that grain should be a big issue with decent 400 ISO film... are these images scanned from the print or from the negative?
     

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lots of grain at canon iso 1000