Film speed and cam settings.

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Luminosity, Aug 18, 2005.

  1. Luminosity

    Luminosity No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Ok I only just realized now, with a sinking heart, that my camera was set at the wrong speed whilst I was shooting with 3200 Ilford in New Orleans last weekend. I forgot all about setting it so my camera was left at 400.

    I took, what I think is going to be, great shots and now I'm kicking myself BIG TIME if I've buggered it up. What happens when you shoot with a 3200 and your camera is set to 400 ? What do the pictures turn out like generally ?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Your shots will be 3 stops over exposed.

    Might be salvageable, though I don't know anything about that side of it.
     
  3. 'Daniel'

    'Daniel' TPF Noob!

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    At least you learned something ;)
     
  4. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    If it is B&W then you under-develop the film. You will get lower contrast 'flatter' negs but you can use a harder paper to offset this.
    Do a clip test and try giving 10% less development as a starting point.
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I say that there is no such thing as ISO 3200 film anyway. It's probably much closer to 800 or 1000, so you're probably only about 1 to 1.3 stops overexposed. I bet they come out alright.
     
  6. Luminosity

    Luminosity No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Really ? Goes to show how much of a newbie I still am to the world of film and photography. Is it simply a case of " this would be the quality of photograph if there was such a thing as ISO 3200 " kinda deal ?

    I really really hope they turn out ok....I've put them in at a lab and they're sending the film out for processing so I am going to call them and explain, just for insurance. They'll probably realize what happened anyway.

    I dont think I'll get to go back to New Orleans again , to take more shots. The shots I did take were some of those ' in the right place at the right time' sorta moments. So outta all the rolls of film I've taken thus far since I became interested in photography..... this roll is the most important to me.
    * crosses fingers*

    Thanks for the answers guys..much appreciated. :hugs:
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Read the technical publications on Kodak Tmax 3200p and Ilford Delta 3200 (available at their websites), and even the manufacturers say their true speed is more like ISO 800, or ISO 1000 if you use the fancy Kodak/Ilford developer. ISO 3200 is pushing the film. The lab may even be know the manufacturer recommended development times for ISO 800, and from there ISO 400 should be easy to figure out. At worst they will be contrasty and grainy, at best they will still be more contrasty and grainy than had you been using Delta 400.
     

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film speed setting for 3200 film