Film Speeds

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by TommyF, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. TommyF

    TommyF TPF Noob!

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    Ok, yes yes Im new, so if this question has been asked then I apologize. Anyway... I am reading Understanding Exposure and maybe I havent read far enough into the book yet, but if I use ISO 800 film and snap a photo of our new baby at..lets just say 1/25 shutter speed, then I do the same thing with ISO 400 at a slightly faster shutter speed (whatever speed would make the correct exposure); would there be any difference in how rich the photo would come out? Also, what speed of film do you guys recommend I get for this type of photograph? Any help is greatly appreciated as we just had a baby and I plan on setting up the tripod and getting a nice picture of our new little boy to make announcements to send out. Thanks and cheers!! :mrgreen:
     
  2. T-town photographer

    T-town photographer TPF Noob!

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    If you are shooting "portraits" with 800 speed film you will end up having more grain than is desired. If you acess to a flash I would stay in the 100 speed area and go no higher than 200. A good all around film speed that is pretty versatle is 400 speed because you are not as dependent on lighting.

    Hope this helps

    Michael
     
  3. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    No, with iso 400 you will have to use a slower shutter speed ( 1 stop slower ), the higher the number the more sensitive the film is to light. Most films can be pushed or pulled, i use Ilford HP5(B+W film iso400) which can be pushed to iso1600 and still get very good results which means you expose the film as iso1600 but you must tell the developer you have pushed it because it is all in the developing if the camera has a meter you set the film speed so it thinks it is loaded with iso1600 or what speed you want and then then meter compensates, then in the darkroom you alter developing time
    If you are shooting colour try KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTAR 100 Film it's not cheap but gives very good results
    This is HP5 pushed to iso1600
    [​IMG]
     

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