Film to Digital

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Rahb, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. Rahb

    Rahb TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2006
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Mansfield, Texas
    I made a previos post and through way too much out there, therefore I'll get to a more specific question. I'm going to be staying with a 35mm Camera (Canon EOS Rebel X). However, I want to be able to take my amatuer photos from film to digital so I can start exploring with Photoshop.

    I have heard that taking them to places like Walmart to develop and scan the negatives offers poor results. Is it really "poor" beyond workability, or is this just the opinion of a professional who has the means to do better with his knowledge/tools?
    Would a camera store such as Wolf camera offer me better scanned negative results?

    Before someone gies me the tip of buying a negative scanner, it is out of the question. I own a scanner already (doesn't do negatives) and my wife won't let me spend money on another one just for negatives right now.

    I can scan the pictures myself after they are developed, but I don't know if they will offer the same results, but if someone has some tips on this (ie, don't use glossy paper, etc) it would be greatly appreciated.

    :hail:
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,817
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Before I got a digital camera...I had all my film scanned and put on CD at the time of developing.

    I've never liked the Kodak picture CDs from Wal-mart...however, just about any place that develops film can give you a CD. Cost-co is usually pretty good for photo services...and it's cheap (with a membership, of course). I used to use a local camera/photo store...it was more expensive than Wal-mart but the scans and prints were better quality.

    The scanned images should be good enough for you to play around with, in Photoshop. Usually, the digital images are perfect size to make 4x6 prints but I have made 8x10 prints with little difficulty.

    Don't bother scanning the prints. The quality is not great and it takes up lots of time.
     
  3. Rahb

    Rahb TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2006
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Mansfield, Texas
    Thank you, everywhere I've looked people say it is a waste of time and they will look horrible..go to digital camera. I'm not an "idiot" I know digital slr cameras are the new wave, but I've seen great photos taken with OLD cameras....I've also seen great photos from those cameras on the internet, and i know they do it somehow. All anyone wants to tell you is that the results are crappy, but I didn't know what to make of their opinions. I will jsut do some shopping around with some expirimental rolls of films....see what local store/camera store gives me the best results. Thanks for the tip.
     
  4. 'Daniel'

    'Daniel' TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,507
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Manchester, UK

    The truth is results of scanning film can be great. But doing it yourself will not be unless you have a film scanner. doing it on a flat bed won't produce great results although internet worthy images can easily be done this way.
     
  5. slickhare

    slickhare TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2005
    Messages:
    678
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    cali
    i agree, i tried doing it for some film shots of mine at home on my scanner. the results were ok. but not great. i recomment having them done professionally if you can.
     
  6. Rahb

    Rahb TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2006
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Mansfield, Texas
    So, short of buying a negative scanner, store scans are my best alternative.
     
  7. Rahb

    Rahb TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2006
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Mansfield, Texas
    What exactly do you calssify as "professinaly"? I mean the closest camera store is Wolf
     
  8. 'Daniel'

    'Daniel' TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,507
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    I don't know about them specifically but any developer will have a dedicated film scanner. Unless they use an enlarger. Most are digital now.

    So that should be fine. Ask them if they can make a CD if not go somewhere else.
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    It depends on the employees. If you have a Walmart that is staffed by people actually interested in photogrpahy, you might get pretty good results. If you go to a "pro" lab with a bunch of no-skill burn-outs then you won't get good results.

    Talk to the people at the lab, try them out, and if the product sucks, move on to the next lab. Finding good photo service can be difficult, but is well worth it in the long run.
     
  10. bobaab

    bobaab TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Park Ridge, IL/West Lafayette, IN
    my friend uses slide film, so the film gets developed into slides I guess..and are not negatives. You can scan these with ordinary scanners from what I believe...

    The film itself is a little more expensive and developing is the same, if i remember correctly.
     
  11. molested_cow

    molested_cow No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    3,628
    Likes Received:
    460
    Location:
    Here N There
    It really depends on where you go. I alternate between a local semi-professiona shop and Ritz/Wolf. The semi-pro shop charges about $14 a roll (inc. developing) whereas Ritz charges around $10.

    Here's the difference:

    Semi-pro

    [​IMG]


    Ritz:

    [​IMG]


    I don't have them in their original res now(at office), but the difference is the color and mainly the noise. Impurities(dust) is common on Ritz scans. The scan is also at higher res from the semi-pro shop.

    However, I have also been to excellent Ritz camera shops. It depends on who's doing it. Here's an example:

    [​IMG]

    I have annual membership from Ritz so that helps me to save some money, but not the quality.

    If I were you, I will probably get a film scanner and do it yourself. It's just time consuming.
     
  12. molested_cow

    molested_cow No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    3,628
    Likes Received:
    460
    Location:
    Here N There
    I alternate between Ritz and a local semi-pro camera. When I say "semi-pro", I meant it's run by photographers selling good photo equipment. The price difference is about $4~5 a roll, which can be about 50%.

    Here's the difference:

    [​IMG]

    Local store:


    Ritz:

    [​IMG]

    I don't have them in their original res now since I am in the office. The main difference is noise. The local camera shop scans them at higher res and the colors tend to be brighter. Ritz is cheaper, which is the only reason why I go there. If you know you have good shots in a particular roll, invest a little more on it.

    However, I have also been to excellent Ritz stores. It really depends on who's doing it. Here's an example:

    [​IMG]

    If I were you I will get a film scanner and do it yourself instead. It's just time consuming though.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
digitize negatives wolf camera
,

film scanner example

,
ritz camera film scan