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Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by tranceplant, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. tranceplant

    tranceplant TPF Noob!

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    Ok, I just got this new Hoya poloraizing filter, it looks great and all. I am kind of a newbie in photography so I was wondering if anyone had sugestions on how and where to use this kind of filter. When to use and when not to use....

    i am going to NYC in 2 months and I wanted to bring it. would it be good for a shot from the park of the buildings? should I remove the filter is there is going to be people in the picture?

    c'mon reply :)
     
  2. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I will use a circular polarizing filter along with my UV haze filter anytime that I am shooting outside. You will particularly notice the difference when in the sky-scapes and water as it deepens the hue and cuts through a lot of haze. It's basically the difference between how the world appears through quality sunglasses on a bright sunny day and not having sunglasses at all.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I use my polarizing filter when shooting outside, it can really deepen the color of a blue sky and take the glare off of foliage to get a deeper green. It can also dramatically alter how a watery scene looks because it can cut out reflections.

    You can usually see the effects quite well, just turn the filter while looking though the viewfinder. It's effects are strongest when you are looking perpendicular to the sun's rays.
     
  4. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    Use it lots, and then decide if and where you like it. ;)

    I put mine outside seldomly... only when I want to get rid of something.
     
  5. tranceplant

    tranceplant TPF Noob!

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    thx for your help guys.... it looks like the thread is dying so I need more people to share :-D
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    A polarizer cuts glare, which gives the effect of darkening blue skies, and saturating colors. Foliage particular becomes a much lusher looking green, rather than the bluish green it looks like without the pol filter under bright, sunny skies. Although the effect is less noticable, it also works great on overcast days.

    A pol filter may not be good in all situations. The outer ring of the pol filter must be rotated to get the effect. You can see the polarizing effect come and go as you rotate. Some filters have a mark that if lined up with the sun will provide the max effect, but it's usually easy enough to see it through the viewfinder.

    You will get maximum polarizing effect outdoors if your lens axis is perpendicular to the arc of travel for the sun. In other words if you stick your arms directly out to either side of your body, and rotate your body so that one hand (either one) is pointing where the sun rises, and the other at where it sets, if you point your camera in the direction your nose is pointing you will get maximum polarizing effect (with the proper rotation of the outer ring). The more you turn so that you are facing where the sun rises or sets, the less effect you'll get. With wide angle lenses you can sometimes see the variation in polarizing effect as it lessens. This is easy to see in the sky where one side of the photo the sky is almost navy, and it fades to cyan at the other side.

    You get max glare reduction on reflective surfaces if the lens axis is angled at about 30 degrees to the reflective surface.

    Polarizers block 1.5 to 2 stops of light.
     
  7. tranceplant

    tranceplant TPF Noob!

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    ksmattfish: thx for your great tips.

    I was looking at your personal site and I noticed you did not have any contact section or information. I was looking for it because I wanted to know where those amazing pictures of yours were taken!
     
  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Most of the photos were taken in or around Lawrence, Kansas.

    You can look on my business site for contact info. Camerafetish.com is still a work in progress.
     
  9. tranceplant

    tranceplant TPF Noob!

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    ^thx mate, great pictures btw
     
  10. PachelbelsCanon350D

    PachelbelsCanon350D TPF Noob!

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    Major bump here!! I've got a question on polarizing filters too. I also have the Hoya circular polarizer. But I'm curious, does it have an effect in overcast skies too?

    Is the polarizing filter the one you'd use to get more contrast and texture when shooting turbulent weather or clouds?

    Thanks :D
     
  11. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    It won't really have an effect on a totally grey sky as it is designed to remove scattered light, or glare. The sky becomes one giant softbox when it's overcast, so it'll just lose you a bit of light.

    Maybe - if there's glare, use a polariser. If there's blue sky and you're shooting into a light subject, use a polariser. If it's just stormy weather, don't bother.

    Rob
     
  12. PachelbelsCanon350D

    PachelbelsCanon350D TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Rob :thumbup: Is there a filter that they use to get high contrast in turbulent, roiling clouds? Like thunderstorms coming and going? Or is this just done with post-processing in photoshop (or in the case of film, using magentas in the enlarger?)
     

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