Filter or protection

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by dslrchat, May 10, 2008.

  1. dslrchat

    dslrchat TPF Noob!

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    When I purchased my XTI and 2 lenses, I noticed both lenses have a "filter" on them.
    Tiffen Haze 1
    Are these actual filters (have any actual purpose) or just to protect the lens from dirt scratches etc.
    Thanx
     
  2. ZacMan1987

    ZacMan1987 TPF Noob!

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    Combination of both.

    Haze filters cut down on some of the "washed-out" look you get when shooting in bright sunlight. They also happen to be really cheap, and used a LOT, so they serve as a great thing to keep between your lens and whatever danger it might be exposed to.

    Haze filters will often be used in conjunction with other filters as well.
     
  3. JimmyO

    JimmyO TPF Noob!

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  4. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Course you can reduce the washed out affect by stopping down in manual mode.
     
  5. evo5gsr

    evo5gsr TPF Noob!

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    Can someone elaborate on this "washed-out" effect?
     
  6. Ben-71

    Ben-71 TPF Noob!

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    Outdoors, at high altitudes (especially on snow/ice) or at sea or sea shore, either the UV-absorbing atmosphere is thinner or there's much reflection of UV.
    The result may be a bluish cast or low contrast & hazy far objects.
    A UV blocking filter would solve much of this problem.
    Also, air-born particles (water, dust, smog) may scatter both UV and part of the visible spectrum.
    To reduce this haze, a UV filter is not enough. A haze filter solves this better.
    It blocks both UV and part of the violet-blue visible spectrum, therefore shifting the overall color balance a bit towards the warmer hues.
    With black & white, a yellow, or orange, or even a red filter may be used for an even greater effect, more penetration through haze and dramatic dark sky & white clouds.
    Red light penetrates better though air-born particles because its much longer wave length.
    As it zig-zags less, it bumps into fewer particle on the way, and less of it is scattered.
    In all other conditions, a UV or a weak haze filter has no effect, but can protect the lens.
     

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