Filter question #2...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Axel, Nov 9, 2004.

  1. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

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    Does anyone know what the following filters are about: Tiffen 52mm FL-B filter and an FL-D filter? I have been trying to find some info on the web but no success so far...
     
  2. Jamie R

    Jamie R TPF Noob!

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    Fluorescent balancing filters if you shoot near fluorescent lights.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

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    Thanks.

    And they only serve their purpose when shooting under fluorescent lights?
     
  4. photogoddess

    photogoddess TPF Noob!

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    Yup - unless you want a magenta cast to everything.
     
  5. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

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    Thanks!
     
  6. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Best to avoid shooting colour under flourescents. There are so many tubes and they all have such whacky spectrums that filtering is a lottery. Several tubes have a high tight peak in the green and virtually nothing can filter it out.
    Better to shoot clean (filterless), scan and clean it up in photoshop. You should be able to filter OK with that.
    Don't know how digital cameras cope with flourescents. I remember reading a tech paper about how high quality digital needs stabilised flicker-free lighting. Flourescents flicker something terrible. Have not heard of any problems though and DV cams don't seem to mind (although they get the green cast too)
     
  7. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

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    And NOW I am looking at a polarizer filter... Problem is that it seems as if it says that SOME cameras with AF need the circular... I have a Nikon N50 and don't know if I can use a simple polarizer or a circular...

    And question #2: I am also interested in a warming filter. It's a Hoya 52mm A2... But is that the same as the 81A? And how do I have to adjust the exposure for these filters... They talk about 1/3 step up or down... Since I have an AF I can only add or subtract ½... How important are these exposure numbers when it comes to taking pictures with filters?

    Thanks and sorry to bug you all!
     
  8. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    No problem.
    Can't help with #1 as I don't use Nikons.
    #2: I presume you mean a Wratten 2A. I think hoya use the same system. Their website is a ***** and has no info.
    A 2A is used to absorb UV
    An 81A is a specific clour temperature balancing filter for tungsten film to daylight.
    May look vaguely similar but their transmission properties are not and they don't do the same job.
    I can go into greater detail if you like but I hope this helps.
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I've had the best luck shooting under flourescents using Fuji pro neg film without a filter (NPH or NPS). There are too many varieties of flourescent lights, and each would require individual testing to determine the proper filter.
     
  10. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    You have to adjust for more exposure, as the filter is blocking some of the light. Think about it, a filter that increased the amount of light entering the camera would be something pretty special. If you ever find one let me know! :wink:

    As long as you are using a camera that meters through the lens, you don't really have to worry about it. The filter blocks the light going to the light meter also, so just meter as you normally do.

    If had to deal with a 1/3 stop filter factor, but could only make 1/2 stop adjustments, I would increase the camera exposure by 1/2 stop for neg film. This would end up being a 1/6th stop overexposure, which isn't much. When shooting slides I wouldn't adjust at all, resulting in a 1/3 stop underexposure, which should help with color saturation anyway.
     
  11. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Not strictly true. The cells used in camera meters tend to have a different spectral response to the the film. Filters on the lens change the light spectrum going in so the light meter can be fooled into going under or over depending on a number of factors. If you need to take 1/2 a stop out but the meter thinks the light is 1/2 stop brighter your exposure can be a whole stop out.
    I would advise you use a handheld if the work is critical.
     
  12. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    Handheld incident meters will always give you a more accurate exposure, but for 'every-day' use they can be a right faff if you're trying to account for different types of filters...

    If you're able to trust your TTL (through the lens... ie in camera) metering for normal, unfiltered shots, then you're pretty much safe to continue trusting it for shots when your filter's in place....

    My best advice... Bracket your exposures around the cameras reccomended setting
     

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