Filter question (77mm)

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by seemoo, Dec 28, 2006.

  1. seemoo

    seemoo TPF Noob!

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    Hi

    I just got the Canon 10-22mm wide-angle lens. From what I can tell so far it totally rocks.

    Unfortunately i forgot to order the filter with it. I searched for it on amazon and was surprised in the huge price range on those 77mm filters ($14 to over $100).

    So what filter would you guys recommend? What's the difference between a UV multi-coated haze filter and just a simple cheap UV filter?

    Anybody has the same lens and could recommend a filter?

    Thank you for you help.

    simon
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    The fancy coatings are supposed to help decrease flare, increase contrast, etc... I never worried much about it when I only shot film, but supposedly digital is a little more sensitive to these things so it may be worth the extra investment.

    Anyone using filters with their digital cameras may want to check out this article/filter test shoot at www.shootsmarter.com (you have to log in, but there are lots of good articles there, very informative).

    http://shootsmarter.com/infocenter/wc044.html
     
  3. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    hm, i always thought it was only the coating of the rear lens, the on closest to the digital sensor, which causes the trouble with reflections. But I might be mistaken.

    Then the filter coating would not help there.

    I never experienced any difference between film and digital, partially using the same lenses and filters.
     
  4. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Every single glass to air meeting causes some image degredation through refraction, and adds the potential to increase flare. So putting a filter on a lens adds two more glass to air points. Depending on the lens design there will be some internal glass to air points too. In some zooms this can add up to a lot of places for potential problems.

    In my experience digital seems much more prone to flare issues than film. I don't know if it really has anything to do with digital vs. film though, or if it's just that the digital format I use (APS-C) is so much smaller than the film formats I use. In the article I linked to above they used a Canon 30D, but comment that the problems would be less with a full frame DSLR.

    I don't know how much chromatic aberation has to do with multicoatings, filters, and such, but while I never ever worry about CA when shooting film, it's definately an issue with digital, particularly in back lit situations.
     
  5. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well, I use exactly the same format on film and on digital (35mm).

    I was told that the main problem are the reflections between the rear lens and the sensor (or the glass on the sensor), which is reflective itself, more than the film is. But as I said, this is just what a non-expert was told by a non-expert ;)
     
  6. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    After I found a lot of CA in my digital shots, I went back to my film shots and looked at them in the same magnification, and saw it as well (where i never really realised it before).

    I could imagine though, that sensors themselvs add a bit to the problem.

    If you get colour fringing due to backlight, that is not CA though (as it also occurs in the centre of the frame), but a sensor problem.
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Now that I think about it, I use about 99% BW when shooting film, so maybe that's why I never noticed it. ;)
     
  8. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    now, that is a good one :lmao:

    OK, let's end thread hijacking now ;)
     
  9. seemoo

    seemoo TPF Noob!

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    Thank you very much for this link. It was incredible helpful and I have a much better idea of what filters do.

    Thanks again.
     
  10. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I own that lens and more importantly, did you buy the LENS HOOD? Great protection for $30. Always a lens hood, rarely a filter.

    FYI, If you are thinking of getting a circular polorizer for that lens, go try them out at a photo shop first. The only one that I found that worked with my 10-22 was the Hoya Ultra series. The other, cheaper polorizers did not maintain a constant color across the filter. A blue sky was lighter at the edges and darkened toward the middle due to the wide angle of view at 10mm. I am curious if others that own this lens have experienced the same thing.
     

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