Filter question for B&W, jungle setting,etc. Here I go!

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by MyOwnPath, Jun 4, 2004.

  1. MyOwnPath

    MyOwnPath TPF Noob!

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    Hello again friends...

    I leave in just 3 days for central america for a duration of 2 1/2 months, and oooh, I'm excited. Of course the camera comes along (I'm backpacking...the camera and lenses are about 15% of my pack, but ther'll be no sacrificing of weight there!).

    I am from the United States, and have not been in Central America jungles before. I have experience with fairly low light situations, but the defracted light under jungle canopies and around ruins are unique I;m told.

    I will be shooting mostly black and white; I'm taking a polarizing filter, a UV, orange, dark blue, an 81B warming filter (for color film), and a neutral density x 4 filter.

    My question is, which of these are best for low light foliage and dense forest situations? I won't be able to develop while I'm on the road, so i won't even know if i screwed it all up till i get back!

    Ah, it'll be nice, on top of a volcano, snapping markets and festivals in Guatemala and river trips in costa rica. Any ideas on spots to head would be welcome! Thanks so much!
     
  2. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    I can't help at all, but I just wanted to say have a great trip! It sounds wonderful and exciting. I am sure you will get lots of fabulous photographs. Good luck!! :D
     
  3. graigdavis

    graigdavis TPF Noob!

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    About the only one of those that I would use when shooting B&W is the orange filter. All the rest may slow the shutter down too much if its going to be kinda dark under the shade. And if you can I guess I would use a polarizing filter for shooting color. Again, depends if its going to slow it down too much.
     
  4. MyOwnPath

    MyOwnPath TPF Noob!

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    Also, would it be benificial in this situation to push my film speed?

    How many stops would one adjust with an orange filter and polarizer together? Thanks

    --Trav--
     
  5. MyOwnPath

    MyOwnPath TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the encouragement! And if y'all are reeeealy good and helpful, maybe I'll find a scanner and share some portfolio when I return.

    Of course, after I develop all of my film and print everything out, I'll only be able to afford living in a cardboard box...with my cameras.

    --Trav---
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Edit: whoops, did some sort owacky post. See original post below :lol:
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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  8. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    If you push some of them, make sure you mark it well on the canisters so you don't forget by the time you get home!! ;)
     
  9. MyOwnPath

    MyOwnPath TPF Noob!

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    I am taking along a 50mm, a 35-70 tele, and an 80-200 tele, as well as a 2x converter, in case I get into wildlife. It's a manual-auto Minolta SLR, but I never ever use the auto settings. They never even do what I want.

    I have ISO 400 kodak b&w film and ISO 800 fuji color.

    --Trav--
     
  10. MyOwnPath

    MyOwnPath TPF Noob!

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    AND a wide angle screw in lens.
     
  11. voodoocat

    voodoocat ))<>(( Supporting Member

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    Bring a tripod and some Velvia slide film so you have some nice saturated fine grained shots from the trip. ISO800 color film is going to be pretty grainy.
     
  12. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Gosh, this trip sounds so amazing! :) You've been given some excellent advice here. All I would add is that if you really want to walk away from this trip with the highest-quality shots you can get, possibly for enlargement later, you WOULD do better to take the slowest film you can and just push it (marking it as such as Orie mentioned) to better avoid too much grain.

    Have fun!! I'm totally jealous. ;) I hope you remember to show us your images when you get back!
     

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