Filter question

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by BostonBrother, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. BostonBrother

    BostonBrother TPF Noob!

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    I have been looking for a polarizing filter for my 50mm lens and I have seen that there are a bunch of lenses for sale on ebay that average between 15 and 20 dollars for sets of three filters usually a uv, one for indoor lighting, and the polarized filter. I'm looking for opinions as to whether these filters are ok or just a waste of money.
     
  2. molsen

    molsen TPF Noob!

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  3. Rachelsne

    Rachelsne TPF Noob!

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    Mine wasnt to bad, I got it in Best Buy in the US, It was a sunpak circular polariser, it is $19.99 and is not bad for the price.
     
  4. molsen

    molsen TPF Noob!

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    i would recommend getting multicoated filters. I used to think it wasn't necessary, but I found myself having to take the filters off anytime a light point was in the frame because of the ghosting. they're a little more expensive, but no ghosting with MC!
     
  5. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Expect to pay $$$ for a good CPL. You are adding another piece of glass in front of your lens, why put a cheap one there?

    Brands to have a look at are B+W & Hoya. Definitely get the multicoated.
     
  6. BostonBrother

    BostonBrother TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the advice everyone. Your comments brought up another question however. I'll be using this filter on a 35mm SLR and now I am wondering if I should get the standard polarized filter or the circular.
     
  7. molsen

    molsen TPF Noob!

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    for film, use a linear polarizer. for digital, use circular polarizer
     
  8. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    I'm fairly certain the circular will work best with the camera's metering. I know that's the rule of thumb for digital... not sure about film.

    I did want to second the other posters as far as getting a good polarizer. The filter can be used (and probably should be used) for almost all outdoor shooting and it's affects can not be recreated in post processing.

    I'd advise to go without a polarizer for awhile and save up the dough than to buy a cheaper one now.
     
  9. molsen

    molsen TPF Noob!

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    keep in mind, however, most polarizers do filter out some light....usually 1/3 stop's worth or so
     
  10. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    There are very few reasons to choose a linear instead of a circular, so it is a safe bet to go for a circular polarizer. The type of sensitive medium does not matter, it is exposure and autofocus systems that may be affected by linear polarizers.

    A perfect polarizer would lose one stop of light (ie one stop of randomly polarized light), real ones may lose a little more. I agree with the general advice to get a good one rather than a cheap one.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  11. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Incorrect. Most late model film cameras must use circular polarizers. It has nothing to do with film vs. digital. It's related to the auto-exposure and auto-focus mechanism inside the camera.
     
  12. molsen

    molsen TPF Noob!

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    i stand corrected, thanks
     

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