Filter Suggestions

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by KevinisXavier, Oct 3, 2009.

  1. KevinisXavier

    KevinisXavier TPF Noob!

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    I am currently a college student and have been shooting for not too long but not too short either so I do know a couple of things here and there but I never really got around to buying filters for my lenses. I have 1 Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens and a Sigma 18-55mm lens. Not too long ago I bought one UV filter and an ND filter from sunpack at best buy except I have come to realize that they really don't anything at all.

    I like doing a lot of landscapes and experimental things as such as light painting and a couple of other things but I would like to know if anyone could recommend some good quality ND, Polarizing or Infrared filters that are up to 100$ maybe a little more?
     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Never scrimp on filters. A bad filter is worse than none at all. I always recommend that a polarizer should be the first filter anyone, especially outdoor photographers, add to their kit. Look to Heliopan, Singh-Ray or B+W for the really good stuff; Tiffen or Hoya Multi-coated if you're a little more budget minded. If you want graduated NDs, then look to the gel filters, either Lee, Singh-Ray or Cokin.
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    I can't endorse Cokin filters. +1 on the polarizer and a set of Graduated ND filters for landscape work.

    Lee, B+W, Singh-Ray, Heliopan, Hoya...:thumbup:

    For landscape work you'll want the square filters and a holder, not the round screw to the lense filters, so you can move the GND's up and down to fit the scene you're shooting.

    Most filters have limitations. Polarizers work best in the early morning and late afternoon when the Sun is less tan 30 degrees above the horizon and the Sun 90 to the lens axis.
     

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