Filters? Any info and Examples?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by SteveEllis, Jun 20, 2006.

  1. SteveEllis

    SteveEllis TPF Noob!

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    Hi Guys,

    I would like to start buying filters, but I dont know anything about filters. Could you give me some info please? Any example photos would be awesome :)

    Is IR a totally different photography technique or is that just a filter too?

    Thanks,
    Steve.
     
  2. ThomThomsk

    ThomThomsk TPF Noob!

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    IR film reacts to ultraviolet and visible light, but has greater sensitivity at the red end of the spectrum that extends towards the infrared. Where conventional film can't see much beyond 650 nanometers, IR film works up to almost 800nm.

    If you only want to record longer wavelength red light and IR then you use a deep red filter, or to record only IR you use a filter that blocks all UV and visible light. This is opaque as far as the eye is concerned, which makes focussing with an SLR a little tricky, and metering is difficult - bracketing is the order of the day.

    Ilford is about to re-introduce its black & white IR film, SFX, which was a casualty of the receivership. Unfortunately this will only be in 35mm, but I'll buy some anyway I think. Kodak and I think Maco also have IR offerings, and Kodak even has a colour IR film.
     
  3. Fate

    Fate TPF Noob!

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    i would start off your filter collection with a Polerizer and UV filter.

    PL to saturate skys etc, and the UV filter mainly for protection of your lens
     
  4. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The filters you'll wish to acquire will depend on what medium you use [B&W film, color film, digital.]

    If at all possible, purchase filters for your largest diameter lens and use step-down rings for your smaller lenses. That way, you only need one of each type regardless of lens.
     
  5. SteveEllis

    SteveEllis TPF Noob!

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    UV for protection of your lense? Can you explain this a little further please?

    I currently have a Canon Eos 300 Rebel, shooting on film. Largest lens diameter is 58mm

    I have only shot with colour film so far.
     
  6. Fate

    Fate TPF Noob!

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    Basically, a UV filter is a clear filter that you put on your lens. It filters out UV light reducing haze (espeically at high altitudes) but since it is clear, you dont have to take it off! Its much better scratching a £10 filter than a £200 lens!
     
  7. Fate

    Fate TPF Noob!

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  8. SteveEllis

    SteveEllis TPF Noob!

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    Ah, I see, I thought it protected it from UV for a mo :lol:

    I've just checked my 58mm lens, I already have a UV(0) filter attached. Also just realised my biggest lens is my new 70-300mm which is 62mm
     
  9. DestinDave

    DestinDave Master of Non Sequitur

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    One thing I did early on was buy my filters in the largest size I needed (62mm) and then bought several step-down rings so I could use them on smaller lenses. A LOT cheaper than buying 3 or 4 of the same type filter.
    If you shoot mainly color I'd suggest a Polarizer, a neutral-density (4x or 8x), and possibly a warming filter.
    I started out shooting mainly b&w and in addition to the polarizer I also got a set of filters for b&w photography: red, yellow, blue, and green. I think these are critical for good b&w photos. For example: red and green colors have relatively the same gray scale: i.e. they will appear the same tonally in a b&w image. Using a red filter will lighten reds and deepen greens. Conversely, a green filter will lighten greens and deepen reds. This is useful when shooting a still life of red roses.
    Also, consider looking into a Cokin system. A little pricier but a nice system with a lot of specialty filters not available in round screw-mounts.
     
  10. SteveEllis

    SteveEllis TPF Noob!

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    So the colour filters in B&W photography are used to get a better contrast.

    What is a neutral density filter?

    What is the cokin system?

    Polarizing filter reduces glare and gives more vibrant colours?
     
  11. Keta

    Keta TPF Noob!

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    These are really good questions! I need to know the answers as well.

    *sits patiently behind Steve*
     
  12. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    An ND (neutral density) filter is simply a filter that simply lets less light through, and causes no kind of color shift. This can be useful if you want yo get longer exposures during the daytime, or if you want to be able to use a wider aperture for narrower DOF when it is bright out. They also make graduated ND filters in which one half of the filter is ND and the other half is clear. This can be useful in landscape work for balancing a bright sky against a dimmer foreground.
     

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