Filters

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by kcon, Jul 3, 2008.

  1. kcon

    kcon TPF Noob!

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    Soon i'm going to buy my d40. I'll mainly be taking pictures of landscapes usually with lakes in them. I'm wondering do i need any filters like a UV or polarising one?
     
  2. lockwood81

    lockwood81 TPF Noob!

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    For landscape I would use a polarising filter to get the blue sky, maybe a graduated ND filter.

    A lot of people recommend putting a UV on and leaving it on, but if you don't get a very high quality one ($150 and up) then you will be putting an inferior piece of glass infront of your expensive lens and your pictures will suffer from it.
     
  3. kcon

    kcon TPF Noob!

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    thanks i think i'll go for the polarising filter, also how will i know if it will fit my lens? lol and how do you actually put it on the camera?
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2008
  4. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

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    you must get one that fits your lens. which lens do yoy have? also, im pretty sure it just pops on as far as i know.
     
  5. AndrewG

    AndrewG TPF Noob!

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    Your lens will be marked with the filter diameter in mm and you must buy a filter with the same diameter. The filter screws into the threads on the front of the lens.
     
  6. lockwood81

    lockwood81 TPF Noob!

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    On the lens there will be a number followed by a circle with a line through it. This is your filter size...
     
  7. kcon

    kcon TPF Noob!

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    thanks, just wondering does anyone know what the filter size for the AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED lens is?( the lens you get with the d40 ) since i dont actually have it yet lol
     
  8. kcon

    kcon TPF Noob!

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    Last edited: Jul 3, 2008
  9. Mav

    Mav TPF Noob!

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    No they won't. Just avoid cheap ebay garbage and stick with name brand stuff like Hoya, Tiffen, B+W, or store brands like Promaster or Quantaray and you'll be fine. You don't even need fancy multi-coated ones if you're trying to save some money. I have tons of cheap filters and have seen exactly ZERO loss in image quality aside from some minor ghosting issues once in awhile. No big deal. I remove the filter to get rid of the ghost and then put it back on.
     
  10. Mav

    Mav TPF Noob!

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    Hoya makes good stuff, but I personally think the super duper fancy schmanchy ultra doltra multi-coated pro super filters are overkill. Just get a regular multi-coated one, or heck even a single or non-coated. Chances are you'll eventually upgrade to something other than the 18-55 kit lens which will use larger filters, so I wouldn't spend too much on 52mm filters myself. I have a full set of 52's and I'm glad I didn't spend too much on them, because I have another full set of 67's, and am eventually going to need a full set of 77's too. :roll: I'm glad I never spent too much on my 52's, and despite not being the super duper fancy ones they still work fine.
     
  11. nymtber

    nymtber TPF Noob!

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    I agree with Mav. I make optics (aspheres to be exact) and filters are just double sided flat (known as plano surfaces, or infinite radius) lenses. definitely the most simple lens to make. The tiny amount of glass in a filter is almost not a factor in cost, either. That being said, DO make sure you stick to name brand stuff. Tiffen is good, Hoya...etc. look to be spending $20-60 or more if you desire. Multi-coated is best, as it will allow more light transmission, and less ghosting/flare. I personally put UV filters on all my lenses, Working with glass every day I can honestly say scratches arnt that hard to create! and, sometimes the coatings are easier to scratch than the glass. filters are cheap compared to lenses...
     

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