Filters..........................

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Tyson, Dec 13, 2006.

  1. Tyson

    Tyson TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2006
    Messages:
    652
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Newark Ohio
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I am in need of filters, I want to shot out doors. I have a Evolt E-500( I have had it for 48 hours my first DSLRor SLR ever), I went to Cord camera and look at a polarizer dual coat? for $70. I don't want to waste any money on stuff I don't need. I am going to be traveling around takeing pictures of Covered bridges, light houses, lakes, water falls, rivers and maybe a few indoor/outdoor protraits. Most of the time I will be shooting at fire scenes and auto accidents day and night. I am a volunteer firefighter ans often times carry my camera with me ( I have a Optio S40 that stays in within arms reach when I am at a fire scene). Please Please Please give me a No BS list of filters I should have on hand. I like the look of the fussy water falls and waves, please advise.
     
  2. ericande

    ericande TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2006
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    If you shoot waterfalls I'd get a set of Neutral Density filters. I'm not sure what "fussy" means but if you are talking about the smooth flowing look, ND filters allow you to shoot much slower shutter speeds to achieve that look.

    Other then that, there aren't any MUST HAVE filters. Many would say a polarizing filter is a must though.
     
  3. Tyson

    Tyson TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2006
    Messages:
    652
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Newark Ohio
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Should I pay $70 for a polarizing filter?
    Do you know of any online sorce of less $$$ filters?
    I was just trying to take a picture of a can of spray on top of a table and my camera wanted to focus on the long strech behind it instead of the can why? I put it on spot focus?
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,346
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Polarizers are great, must have filters. Buy one for the largest lens diameter you have, so you can use it on all of your lenses. They can be expensive. I payed over $100 for mine. ND filters can be great, but I think you should probably wait on that until you are more experienced. As for the spray can picture, you were probably too close. All lenses have a minimum focus distance, or a distance from the lens to the subject that they can focus at, and which you cannot go beyond. If you couldn't focus on the can, my guess is that you were too close to it. Your options are many. You can buy close up filters which magnify your image slightly. You'd be a bit further back, within your focus range, but the image would be magnified slightly, giving the appearance of being closer. Another option is extension tubes. A bit more expensive, but can give a sharper image. Extension tubes fit between the lens and the body, and allow you to focus closer. They take away your infinity focus however. The third and most costly option is buying dedicated macro lens.
     
  5. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    yes, if you shoot outdoors, the polariser will be one of your most important filters most likely. mine cost me well about 100 USD, so these things can be expensive.

    Then as already said, ND filters are nice to get motion blur in long exposures in ful daylight.

    And a graduated ND-filter can come in handy if you have a bright sky and darker foreground. there are those which you screw on your lens, where the gradient cannot be shifted up and down, and there are those which are mounted in a special mount to be shifted up and down and hence can be adjusted to the scene you shoot. The latter are available from Cokin and Lee.
     
  6. CMan

    CMan TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    As others said, a polarizer is pretty much essential for outdoor photography. It's definitely worth $70.
     
  7. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    846
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Delavan, Wisconsin, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I agree with the others.

    a Circular Polarizer, Neutral Density (ND) filters and Graduated ND filters of 2 and 3 stops are a good set to carry for Outdoor Photography.
     
  8. The_Traveler

    The_Traveler Completely Counter-dependent Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    18,092
    Likes Received:
    7,451
    Location:
    Mid-Atlantic US
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    A polarizing filter for use with a digital camera must be the circular variety. Regular polarizing filters used on a digital camera will produce moire effects that will spoil your images.

    Why put a cheap piece of glass in front of an expensive lens to take important pictures?
     
  9. Groupcaptainbonzo

    Groupcaptainbonzo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2006
    Messages:
    463
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Turners Hill, West Sussex, UK.
    You are shooting mainly outdoors, so .....
    As previously stated a CIRCULAR polarizer (That is, as opposed to a LINEAR polorizer, which is for manual focus cameras. It's not the shape of the polorizer, it is the construction).
    A warm up ( 81 series filters come in different strengths the most often used will be 81 a, 81b, and 81c.)
    and a neutral Density (Grad or plain about ND1 or ND2 to start with, or one of each).
    That should see you about right for all events (Unless of course someone else has any other ideas)..
    In cold winter light, a warm up helps to bring the warmer yellow/orange tones back into an image. In harsh bright sunlight a polorizer will boost contrast and primary colours, as well as cutting reflections from water and leaves. It does however leave a Blue tinge to an image (Which I love) so a lot of landscape photographers will add a warmup to reduce this...
    A nutral density filter together with a small apperture (f22 or so) will allow you to get a really long exposure when photographing moveing water and give that "Dream like" almost foggy look.

    Price wise.... Go for a well known name you know HOYA, HAMMA, LEE, B&W, etc etc. The cheapest are cheapest for a reason, Often with the top of the range you are paying for a lable. Try to get as far up the Mid range as you can (budget permitting), until you get to know exactly which one you prefer.
     
  10. AluminumStudios

    AluminumStudios TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2005
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I completely don't believe that you need to pay a lot for a polarizer, especially if you are just starting out. I have a respectable Hoya circular polarizer (it's from their cheap line with the green labels) that I paid like $22 for on ebay and it works well. You can probably find a Quantary brand at your local Ritz camera store for pretty cheap too. Then as you get more serious and if you find something about it's quality doesn't suite you, you can look into buying a more expensive one.
     
  11. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,346
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The size of the filter has a huge impact on price, keep in mind. Nobody said you have to buy a top of the line filter, but even a Tiffen polarizer at 77mm is going to be expensive.
     
  12. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    846
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Delavan, Wisconsin, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    At least you don't have to buy them for all your lenses. I get filters for my largest lens (77mm) and then purchase stepup rings for my other lenses.
     

Share This Page