Finally got a moon shot!!

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by UUilliam, Aug 7, 2009.

  1. UUilliam

    UUilliam TPF Noob!

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    I finally captured the moon.. after about 8 exposures and some playing in photoshop (one exposure that was the closest with the best clarity)

    I was using the Optek 500-1000mm with a Opteka x2 extender
    But tbh.. it doesn't change the focal distance so i guess the lens is 500mm without the extender and 1000mm with the extender...
    so i guess the image was taken at 1000mm (although i made exif say 500...)
    + a 1.6x crop sensor = 1160mm or 800mm
    No idea what the aperture was... (it is a ring thingie i just opened it full... no idea what it is...

    Support:
    A £30 tripod... that was rubbish, anytime i locked the head in place, let the camera go, it then decided to fall a bit (so the moon wasnt in the view)
    so put my thinkin cap on and used my monopod on my camera as a 4th leg to keep the camera at w/e height i set it at... still took allot of work...

    anyways here ya go...

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Big

    Big TPF Noob!

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    Holy crap I see the lunar module...jk It's too bad it wasn't clearer otherwise it would be a sick shot. Kinda the opposite of my problem, focused and sharp but not close enough...
     
  3. UUilliam

    UUilliam TPF Noob!

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    wow, quick reply...
    Yeah the telephoto(mirror) lens was cheap (£120) so not the best optics, also it has a greenishy yellow CA around it, I tried to reduce it but didn't help much.

    After a quick observation i noticed this...

    (red circle)
    [​IMG]
    Dust? or really the lunar module? :O lol(no its not an edit...)
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2009
  4. camz

    camz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I think it's marvin the marsian building his space modulator! :lol:

    Besides the softness I also see horizontal lines significant especially on the dark areas. What is that?
     
  5. UUilliam

    UUilliam TPF Noob!

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    I actually have no idea... Roads maybe?
    the Aliens that visit earth every few days have now taken residence upon our moon for easier studying, It took them 8 Life cycles to reach us (with the average alien living 90 human years)
    so to get back to their home planet they will use up roughly another 8 life cycles lol I'm a geek...
     
  6. camz

    camz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    haha..hey the imagination can take you places partner!
     
  7. Sachphotography

    Sachphotography TPF Noob!

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    It's always so dark and lonely though........ ::(
     
  8. astrostu

    astrostu I shoot for the stars

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    Your optics need to be cleaned, possibly your sensor, too. At least blow the lenses with some compressed air. Those doughnuts are out-of-focus (since they're on the lens) dust particles. You're also getting some weird cross-hatch texturing that I'm not sure about since I've never seen before. Could they be wipe marks on the optics?

    If you're using a lens that has an adjustable aperture, you should stop it down by about 1 to 2 stops (3 "clicks" of the f/number is equal to 1 stop, so going from f/4.5 to 5.0 is 1/3 stop, f/5.0 to f/5.6 is 2/3, and f/5.6 to f/6.3 is 1 full stop).

    You also need a longer exposure as this is under-exposed.
     
  9. AverageJoe

    AverageJoe TPF Noob!

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    I wonder if the tripod was slipping or if the moon was moving... have you considered that?
     
  10. UUilliam

    UUilliam TPF Noob!

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    the shot was actually over exposed i pp'd it to show the details better.. might use Highlight tone priority next time
    The optics are rubbish in the lens as i said it is an opteka 500mm - 1000mm Super HD ^2
    mirror lens that cost £120...
    it is okay mind you, not the worst optics i guess...
    but i have no idea how to use the aperture rings... there is 2 rings... 1 that has the stops on it then one that say o -----------------------------> c on it (guessing open -> close but why would they do that....

    @averagejoe
    Tripod was slipping :p as soon as i sat the monopod on the tripod (tripod supported the lens then i used the monopod to hold the camera body up by making the monopod go under the tripod as to trap it so it didn't move) it was fine
     
  11. Stosh

    Stosh TPF Noob!

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    Ah yes, the never ending battle to get the perfect moon shot. What a fun and challenging endeavor. Here are some things to consider.

    The moon moves.
    The atmosphere boils.
    Your tripod flexes and vibrates.
    Your shutter and mirror create vibrations.

    Extenders and barlow lenses are fun and tempting because they can seemingly multiply your focal length forever. The problem is that every time you extend the effective focal length you're paying for it somewhere else - mostly with exposure time. Most people want to expand the moon until it fills up the frame figuring they will get the most detail out of it. This is usually not the case. Your lens starts at f/8 and becomes f/16 with the 2x extender. You have a 12.2 MP sensor on a 1.6 crop frame which means you're already diffraction limited at f/8 with any lens assuming it's perfect. I'm not familiar with the Optek 500mm, but let's assume you are already 2x oversampling the resolution of this lens at its native 500mm. In theory 4x oversampling would be better (shooting at 1000mm), but with all the other factors at stake, let's stick to shooting at 500mm. This allows you to get a shorter exposure. I think you'll find that increased sharpness will more than compensate for the smaller image size.

    ISO: try shooting at higher ISOs also to keep shortening your exposure time. At some point the noise of high ISO will become more prominent than the details you're trying to freeze from the fast exposure time. This is the line you want to ride. Depending on how good the rest of your setup is, my guess is you'd be shooting at ISO 800 or so. If you want to get really geeky, you can take multiple images and then download stacking software that will basically eliminate any noise and you can shoot at even faster ISOs.

    Exposure time or metering. The full moon is pretty low contrast. Any partial moon starts having some serious contrast. Review your shot on the histogram. Keep the moon's detail at the lower end of the histogram which will shorten your exposure time. You can boost the brightness later in PP.

    This was already said before, but shoot when the moon is at its highest to reduce atmospheric interference.

    Use the mirror lockup function to reduce shutter vibrations.

    Use the self timer for 10 seconds or better yet use a remote shutter release.

    Use your heaviest and strongest tripod and step away from your setup well ahead of when it will take the pic.

    Last but definitely the most important: Focus. I assume you're using live view to find focus on the moon. If you're not, then use it. Never try to focus by sight through the viewfinder or by markings on the lens. Also, while you're using live view, find a bright star to focus on, not the moon. Make the star as small as possible - this will be the best focus. It's easier for your eyes to see the star become a pinpoint rather than an object like the moon to come in and out of focus.

    Good luck!
     
  12. astrostu

    astrostu I shoot for the stars

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    NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

    Lowest ISO. There is no reason to shoot at high ISO. Any added noise onto something that's dark is bad. And there's absolutely no reason to use anything but your lowest ISO on the moon unless it's perhaps <10% full or eclipsed. At f/8, your shutter speed should be around 1/80-1/120 sec (depending on the phase and altitude, you may have to adjust) at ISO 100.

    I'm sorry, but it's absolutely ridiculous to suggest shooting the moon at anything but your lowest ISO, let alone ISO 800.
     

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