First black and white shots

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by Jewel, Jan 16, 2004.

  1. Jewel

    Jewel TPF Noob!

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    I finally got around to trying a black and white film. I would have liked mre contrast, but it wasn't a contrasty day - overcast, a bit of rain (you can see ripples in the water in the first shot from the rain), and we were in and out of shade too. Still, I think they turned out pretty well for a first go.

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  2. Thorniest Whisper

    Thorniest Whisper TPF Noob!

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    Jewel, I like those. How did you tint them? I really like the water lilies, but I love the last one! Very introspective
     
  3. Jewel

    Jewel TPF Noob!

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    Hi Thorny

    They haven't been tinted - it's the film. It's the Kodak B&W that goes through normal colour processing (can't remember the name, I threw the box out). The actual photos don't look tinted, but the scan seems to show some colour.

    I love the last shot too - that's my chief assistant, riding buddy and partner. I think the look is "will you just hurry up and finish that film!" :lol: I'm going to have to get that one enlarged and framed - a bit of a contrast to the glamour shots we had done a couple of years ago.

    By the way, all the photos were taken about 200 metres from home - we're lucky enough to have some natural wetlands and a billabong at the end of our street, and we'd just had enough rain after some prolonged drought to bring the area back to what it should be. The last couple of days have seen about 6+ inches of rain so it's all under water now.


    Cheers
    Jewel
     
  4. Thorniest Whisper

    Thorniest Whisper TPF Noob!

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    Jewel. C41 I think is what it's called. I use it instead of B&W only because I don't process my own film and I don't have a good lab to go to for B&W. But when I scan mine I don't get that color to them and when I take them to process I ask for no color saturation at all (not that the high school boys at the lab know what I mean or that I do either!).

    I was viewing the forum with my god daughter and I told her "look' it's a billabong!" I think she thought I was pulling her leg. Thanks for the validation :lol:
     
  5. cowbert098

    cowbert098 TPF Noob!

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    you have some great photos
     
  6. Jewel

    Jewel TPF Noob!

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    I think it's because I get the developing lab to scan the photos.

    Glad to hear I got you in the goodbooks with the god daughter! :D For the record, when a river gets close to the coast (or on a flat area) it meanders around. Billabongs are old river bends that have become land-locked due to the course of the river changing over time.

    BTW thanks Cowbert! Must admit to a certain amount of envy when I see yours - they are usually so clear!

    J
     
  7. Tyjax

    Tyjax TPF Noob!

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    Just for the FYI file. That film is Kodak T400cn. And its good enough for what it is. If you are ever going to print in your own darkroom from the negatives its a pain in the arse. Very, Very hard to up the contrast with that film. I beleive it is the color of the anti-halation. Which comes in at a very light restricting dark orange. I am not sure why Kodak has chosen that color for the anti halation but never the less... All in all good film for the casual black and white. if you want rich contrast and meaty darks grab some Ilford HP5 and have your local pro lab develop and print it for you... You will be wowed.
     
  8. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Jewel, I guessing that you scanned the negatives and not the prints. And also that you scan as color and not B&W. When shooting B&W I mostly use C-41 B&W (and mostly Ilford) myself and sometime get green negatives, usually it just a few frames with the rest of roll coming out fine. I got a roll 120 Ilford XP2 back last week 5 out of 12 frames were green. Why I do not know

    These are the link to C-41 B&W that I know of and have used

    Black & White 400 is a consumer film designed to be printed in mini labs on color paper
    http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pq-path=2/3/9/543/1094/1100&pq-locale=en_US

    Portra 400BW marketed as a pro film for pro color paper
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/prof...bw/portra400BW.jhtml?id=0.1.18.14.21.20&lc=en

    T400 CN marketed as a pro film for B&W paper
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/prof.../t400cn/t400cn.jhtml?id=0.1.18.14.21.22&lc=en

    Ilford XP2 C-41 B&W for B&W paper
    http://www.ilford.com/html/us_english/pdf/XP2SGB_QX.pdf

    Konica also make a C-41 B&W, I has never used this film
    http://www.konica.com/products/film/#mvx400
     
  9. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I like in #2 how the green showed up at the base of the flower
     
  10. Jewel

    Jewel TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Jeff and Tyjax

    Jeff, the developing lab scanned the photos, so I don't know which technique they used. I have noticed in the past that their scans don't do justice to the shots, but not owning a scanner it's my little cop-out.

    Thanks for the hints and links on the films, guys!

    Cheers
    J
     
  11. vonnagy

    vonnagy have kiwi, will travel...

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    nice pics jewel! do you live Queensland? just curious.

    dig the second pic alot, wish my first b&w's came out as good as yours :)
     
  12. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    The big advantage to the C41 BW films is their incredible exposure latitude. Most of it can be shot from ISO 50 to 800 with no change in development.

    Have you seen the Kodak Gold 800 (C41 color) commercial where the family is out on the beach in the bright sun taking pics, and then later, just as the sun has set they are out on the beach again taking pics in the dark? Kodak is trying to push Gold 800 as the all-purpose magical film; it's magical alright, cursed, the pics suck no matter what the light.

    Anyway, these C41 BW films can pull that off; they're the magic film. Shoot it in the sun at 100 or 200, and then walk inside and shoot it at 400 or 800 on the same roll. No special dev instructions necessary; just drop it off at the lab as usual. I like it for when I don't know what the lighting is going to be; it can be very all-purpose.

    My only problem with it has been the contrast issue as Tyjax mentioned. But I think this only happens when you're trying to print on traditional BW paper from the film designed for printing on color paper. The orange base makes it tough.
     

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