First pics with the rebel

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by pilgrim, May 9, 2004.

  1. pilgrim

    pilgrim TPF Noob!

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    Well I went out and picked up a digital rebel...
    I had no idea just how big digital slr's were! :shock: and this is probally one of the smallest.. I still have ALOT to learn about this camera, so im sure my pictures will get better as I learn the functions of the camera.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    I have a few questions..
    "Parameters" I don't fully understand this yet. I have been shooting under Adobe RGB so far because it was the only one I reconized. There is also parameter 1 and 2, then set up 1 2 and 3. Can some one explain this to me?
    grr, while typing that last question out I forgot the other question I had, I'm sure i'll remember it and post it then.:wink:

    Troy
     
  2. pilgrim

    pilgrim TPF Noob!

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    haha, I just finish posting and I remember the other question... :lol:

    My images come out at 3072 by 2048 pixels, but it is only 72 dpi.. I hear someone else on this board had this problem, is there anyway to change it, or am I just stuck with it.
    Also, should I start shooting in raw? Some people seem to say it's the best thing since sliced bread. But I really don't know a whole lot about it.

    Troy
     
  3. westman

    westman TPF Noob!

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    second one real amazing
    how can you capture the birds flying on the sky?!
    I also like the lighting at the third one
     
  4. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    72 dpi is fine because the image is recorded at 28x42 inches sorry I mean 72x108cm that should be good for 24x36 inch prints and up

    RAW mode save both a RAW and JPG revision of the shoot, JPG save only based on the camera setting similar to film, RAW save everything so you may adjust more of the image in your photo software

    Don’t know anything about Adore RGB, have a 10D need to check the manual

    Nice work as usual, like #3 alot
    Also what lenses did you get?
     
  5. c0ntr0lz

    c0ntr0lz TPF Noob!

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    nice pix
    should be geting mine in about a week or so

    are you running the lens that came with it?
     
  6. pilgrim

    pilgrim TPF Noob!

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    I'm using the stock lens, 18-55mm. So far I love it, has an amazing autofocus, those birds were buzzing around and it managed to keep them in focus! I cant wait to pick up a 300 mm lens though :drool: First thing Im going to do once I get my next pay check is pick up that 28-300 mm sigma lens and head to the top of mt. finlayson to photograph the bald eagles!!!! I have been waiting to do this ever since I saw my first bald eagle, back when I was a young pup. :D
     
  7. canonrebel

    canonrebel TPF Noob!

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    Hi Pilgrim,
    Nice camera that rebel. Do not loan it!
    [​IMG]
     
  8. photogoddess

    photogoddess TPF Noob!

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    Yikes! :shock:
     
  9. pilgrim

    pilgrim TPF Noob!

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    :shock: :shock: :shock:
     
  10. Harpper

    Harpper TPF Noob!

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    Congrats on the new camera. Nice pictures too. I like the 3rd one.

    I'll try to answer some of your questions based on what I know so anyone can jump in if they want...

    DSLR are about the same size as film slr...well, at least from the ones I've tried. If you are used to compact digital cameras then yes they are big. They don't call them compacts for nothing. :wink:

    It sounds like you are talking about color profiles. Adobe RGB is a better choice when you are doing prints but I would stick with sRGB if you are only posting to the web. Here's a quote straight from Photoshop's manual, "Adobe RGB is a large enough color space to encompass the colors used in printing. sRGB is a smaller color space than Adobe RGB and supposedly represents the profile of the average monitor."

    Basically Adobe RGB has a broader color range that allows you to use all the colors possible in print. You don't have to use it for print but if you really want to fine tune your colors when printing then use Adobe RGB. sRGB on the other hand will represent what most monitors sees, so the colors you see on your monitor will most likely be the same for everyone. Here's another quote from Photoshop's manual, "Tagging your image with an sRGB profile increases the possibility that more monitors will correctly display the colors in your image."

    I don't own a Canon so I don't know what parameters mean but it sounds like it refers to the different color profile choices. Color profiles can be a pain to work with sometimes. It would be less stressful to use the profile most people use which is sRGB for the internet.

    That's surprising to hear. I assumed all DSLR would use 300 dpi because DSLR buyers tend to be serious amateurs or professionals who are more likely to get their pictures printed. As a comparision my D70 takes pictures at 300 dpi at 3000x2000 resolution and I figured other DSLR did the same. I guess I was wrong. Also a lot of reviews sites don't mention dpi so I thought it was standard. Here are some links to tutorials about the subject: print quality/dpi sizes & resolution 101

    They say that for good prints you should keep you dpi to 250 minimum and 300 is more of the "professional" standard. It's pretty simple to calculate the dpi and max print size. Just divide your resolution (3072x2048) by the dpi you want. For example, if you wanted 250 dpi then your max print would be 12x8 inches.

    Although don't panic just yet. I've read that you can get by with 150 dpi which means a max resolution of 20x14. The best way to tell is to have your pictures printed, but I'm still surprised it captures at 72 dpi. I guess Canon figured most people wouldn't print larger than 8x12 on average, which I think is true for the most part.

    Raw is really nice if you do a lot of post editing in programs like Photoshop. Also the pictures tend to be sharper because the jpeg compression choices in camera might compress the pictures more than you want even at the lowest camera compression. In Photoshop you get to choose how much jpeg compression you want. Another factor is that every time you save a jpeg file the quality gets worst so unless the picture is perfect from the camera you'll want to shot in RAW mode.

    RAW mode also helps you edit more of your pictures because the data is still there. RAW mode uses lossless compression which doesn't throw away data while jpeg uses lossy compression which does throw away unneccesary data to make the files smaller. That's why when you compress too much with jpeg it becomes worse. You are throwing away too much data to make the picture look good anymore.

    Hopefully you found my ramblings useful. :wink:
     
  11. pilgrim

    pilgrim TPF Noob!

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    Very much so!
    Thanks for taking the time to type all that out. Im pretty sure Im going to start shooting raw. But don't you need to get some certain program that read's raw files? and doens't this certain program cost like $600 dollars or something? Or am I just imagining all this.. :lol:

    I'm a little choked about the whole 72 dpi thing to, but I'll live :)

    Thanks again Harpper :D
     
  12. Harpper

    Harpper TPF Noob!

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    No problem. We all help each other out around here so your welcome.

    I think you are imagining things. :wink: RAW files are usually different from brand to brand so Canon and Nikon are different. A software CD should have come with your camera, which would allow you to open RAW files. I don't know how Canon's software works so I won't comment, but with Nikon's PictureProject it automatically installs a plugin to Photoshop so that I could use it. I can also use PictureProject if I wanted but Photoshop is a better editing tool. There's a handful of rebel users on this forum so maybe they can answer your question.

    Another option is that Photoshop CS or known as 8 has RAW files installed as default so you don't even need the plugin. If your camera isn't supported yet, Adobe is constantly updating their RAW file library so it will eventually have one. The rebel has been out for awhile so I'm sure Photoshop CS has it. Although Photoshop CS will cost you $$$ so you are partly right. :wink:
     

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