First Real Estate Job

Discussion in 'Commercial/Product photography' started by A/Ox4, Mar 31, 2016.

  1. A/Ox4

    A/Ox4 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    1800sq/ft. California.


     
  2. Watchful

    Watchful No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Its a cute starter house. Nice pics.
     
  3. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    HolyFacepalm.jpg
     
  4. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    [​IMG]
     
  5. NathanKing

    NathanKing TPF Noob!

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    I do a lot of real estate work, often five or six properties per day. Your images are not bad. Several of them have color temperature issues. The only way around that is to light the room with speedlights or use brushes/masking in Photoshop to correct the warm or cool areas. Sometimes speedlights are not an option as realtors often need you to be in and out within 15-25 minutes. Most of the walls on the interior shots are straight, but the fifth image has considerable keystoning. I would also hit some of the dark areas around/under the furniture with an exposure adjustment brush. A little goes a long way to making the room look inviting.

    Look for small details that are askew. I would have moved the pillow in the third and fourth image as the corner is being smashed into the sofa. The shadow created by your flash and the ceiling fan on the third image also looks a bit unnatural. The camera position on the last image is slightly low, but I understand that you wanted to get the chair in the frame without introducing distortion. Without a tilt/shift lens I may have tilted the camera down slightly and corrected the perspective to get a view from a more natural height.
     
  6. cnoevl21

    cnoevl21 TPF Noob!

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    IMO you may have your camera a little too low. I tend to keep mine 4.5-5ft for interiors, usually 5-6ft for exteriors. I try to be 6"-1' above couches, beds, countertops, etc.
    A good trick is to take one shot using flash and one shot with just ambient light. Use the flash as your base, then mask in the ambient to bring back some of the natural look to the room.
    I highly suggest going on youtube and watch Rich Baum tutorials. They will help you out a lot
     

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