First shots with film

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by someguy5, May 18, 2008.

  1. someguy5

    someguy5 TPF Noob!

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    Hey all.

    I got this nice little Canon EF camera at a flea market (love how its built like a tank) and decided to shoot with it for a day to test it out. About 6 shots into my roll the lens fell apart :confused:. Luckily I caught all the screws. A quick trip to a 99cent store for some tiny precision screws fixed that problem. Then I took the film in to a pharmacy for a CD transfer.

    As I've been told, the thing about film is you never know how your pictures are until you develop them... Maybe I should use a notebook for the next roll? I'm posting the pics below because I'd just like to know what settings i'd need to make them better.

    First six shots with loose lens came out badly as expected.
    Some of the rest are here (shot with kodak ISO200 film):

    [​IMG]
    This one came out fine. It was a rainy and foggy day.

    [​IMG]
    Another one that came out fine. This is the original, but I've already done some gamma correction and contrasting on it to fix it.

    [​IMG]
    Film + light bulbs = no good??? Shot at f/1.8 at 1/15th shutter speed. Gotta love the DOF on these primes.

    [​IMG]
    I have about 7 pictures like above. What the heck is making it so bright? I shot them all at f/8 and 1/60 shutter speed.


    One more question: what's the ASA switch for and how does it affect my pictures? I left it at 200 the whole time.
     
  2. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    the cat issues is the result of using color film that is meant for outdoors , indoors under tungsun light.

    they also look over exposed,

    The ASA function is the same as ISO these days, it just refers to the speed of the film being used and needs to be adjusted depening on which film your using. just think about it as ISO, not ASA
     
  3. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    As a matter of fact ASA=ISO. There is NO DIFFERENCE in the numbers used. The ISO is the International Standards Organization. ASA is the American Standards Association. Different organizations. Same system. It would be like the NFL and the NBA offering the metric system as a system of measurement. The ASA and the ISO offered the same numerical system for indicating a film's sensitivity to light. That's all.

    Good pics. Sweet score on the EF. Keep on clickin'.
     
  4. someguy5

    someguy5 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the info on ASA/ISO.

    So I did some searching and found a tutorial on this site saying in sunlight I should use a shutter speed of 1/ISO @ f/16. So with ISO400 I'd really have to use 1/500 speed? Seems like it might be a little too fast.

    I'm guessing the only way to correct this would be with a flash?
     
  5. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    That is the sunny 16 rule and yes, you round it up to 1/500. But you don't have to use that combination. 1/500 @ f/16 is an exposure value or EV, EV17 to be exact. See, there's these cool things called the Exposure Value Index and the Law of Reciprocity.

    In the Exposure Value Index, shutter speeds have a numerical value as do aperture settings. They are as follows . . .

    1 sec = 0. 1/2 sec = 1. 1/4 = 2. 1/8 = 3. 1/15 = 4. 1/30 = 5. 1/60 = 6. 1/125 = 7. 1/250 = 8. 1/500 = 9. 1/1000 = 10.
    f/1 = 0. f/1.4 = 1. f/2 = 2. f/2.8 = 3. f/4 = 4. f/5.6 = 5. f/8 = 6. f/11 = 7. f/16 = 8. f/22 = 9. f/32 = 10.

    Say your combination of 1/500 @ f/16 is required. Whaddya do now?

    Law of Reciprocity state that exposure equals one amount of light intensity and a reciprocal amount of duration as shown in the following equation.

    e = i + t

    where e stands for exposure, i equals intesity or aperture and t stands for duration of time or shutter speed.

    So, 1/500 = 9. f/16 = 8. 9+8 = 17. EV17. This also gives you some creative leeway. Since 1/500 @f/16 is EV17, that means that 1/1000 @ f/11 is EV17. So is 1/250 @ f/22 and 1/125 @ f/32 and so on.

    And actually, if I recall, the sunny sixteen rule is 1/ISO @ f/(the film's key stop). A film's key stop is the reciprocal of the ISO rating's square root. The square root of 400 is 20 (round it up to f/22). The square root of 200 is around 16. The square root of 100 is 10 (round up to 11). So sunny 16 for ISO 400 film would be 1/500 @ f/22. I think. Could be wrong. Been a while since I used it but check me. I think that's right.


    And they make INDOOR/TUNGSTEN film which will correct for use under incandescent lighting such as tungsten bulbs but will blue off the chart if used in daylight.
     
  6. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    It's called over exposure. Use the camera's meter or Sunny 16 it, if there's not one.

    ASA is for setting film speed.
     
  7. someguy5

    someguy5 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for explaining all that. All very helpful.

    This particular camera has a max shutter speed of 1/1000. So what would I do if i wanted a very shallow DoF in sunlight without an overexposure?
     
  8. Early

    Early TPF Noob!

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    You'd have to use a neutral density filter or slower film... or both.
     
  9. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I take shots of flowing water at 1/2 shutter speed at f/2. In indirect sunlight even. I have three ND filters. One NDx2 (one stop reduction), one NDx4 (two stops) and one NDx8 (three stops). I stack'em all so I can reduce the exposure settings on my camera by a total of six stops if I want to.
     

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on law of reciprocity aperture f/8 and shutter speed of 1/60 the same as f/4 and 1/500? yes or no? why?