First time shooting film....

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by thebasedsloth, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. thebasedsloth
    Offline

    thebasedsloth New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    46
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Glen Burnie, Maryland
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +46 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Finally developed my first disposable camera, Here are my favorites out of the 27:

    [​IMG]
    Skating Rink by TravisChrist777, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Dollar tree firetruck by TravisChrist777, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Stairs by TravisChrist777, on Flickr

    The last one is my personal favorite and was actually the first one I took...

    Critique and comments would be highly appreciated
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2012
  2. dxqcanada
    Offline

    dxqcanada Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2008
    Messages:
    4,657
    Likes Received:
    458
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +458 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    First I would say ... drop the disposable cameras and get a reloadable film camera.
    Film cameras don't cost must these days.

    #1 In the first shot, I am not sure what the subject is.
    #2 ... too much sky.
    #3, I think you are looking at the stairs and the shadow of the stairs ... but there is too much other stuff that distracts. Possibly a different angle would have worked better ?
  3. thebasedsloth
    Offline

    thebasedsloth New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    46
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Glen Burnie, Maryland
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +46 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    My aunt is actually sending me a Nikon N55 (f55) Slr really soon, I just used the disposable as a personal introduction..
    And thanks for the critique Btw, I agree with what you said
  4. Timoris
    Offline

    Timoris New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Holy Bear, Canada
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +26 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    What film was inside that Camera?

    This will be important in the future.

    The film used in this case looks like it was Ilford or Kodak Portra.
    The Portra is used for portraits (Easy way to remember PORTra - PORTrait)

    These would have benefited from Kodak Ektar, gives better, more saturated colours more suitable for landscape. You can still use Ektar for portraits, but it gives a small tan to skin tones.
  5. dxqcanada
    Offline

    dxqcanada Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2008
    Messages:
    4,657
    Likes Received:
    458
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +458 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    I would guess that they are using a Kodak disposable ... that has Kodak Funsaver 800
  6. Timoris
    Offline

    Timoris New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Holy Bear, Canada
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +26 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    That name makes me chuckle.

    (Fast paced Commercial voice)

    NOW! Introducing Kodak FUNSAVER-800!
    SHOOT! People and Pets!
    CLICK! What Was that!?
    THE SOUND OF MEMORIES BEING TAKEN!

    KODAK FUNSAVER-800!
    BUY YOURS TODAY!
  7. Sw1tchFX
    Offline

    Sw1tchFX New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Messages:
    7,500
    Likes Received:
    477
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +477 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    The N55 is a great camera, but make sure you dial in +1 exposure compensation. Color negative film likes to be overexposed (the cheap stuff by ALOT), and when you dial in +1 it will bring up those blacks so they're not just grain and will bump up your saturation and smooth out tonality.
    [​IMG]
  8. thebasedsloth
    Offline

    thebasedsloth New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    46
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Glen Burnie, Maryland
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +46 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Thanks for the tip man!^
    I have a question though, how do you scan negatives? Idek if my scanner is able to scan em but how can you tell if a scanner is capable of scanning film?
    and if its not, is there a way to open the negative in PS and turn it into a positive that way?
  9. Hussain Frutan
    Offline

    Hussain Frutan New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Bahrain
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +20 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    old is gold i think is amazing that u try to shot with flim at this time where every thing has become digital


    kepp up the good work
  10. Frequency
    Offline

    Frequency New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2010
    Messages:
    8,862
    Likes Received:
    678
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Calicut, Kerala,India
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +678 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    i like the second....

    Only if you don't feel bad..... you must select some strong subject from the millions around you... the images you have shown here are sharp and defined but lack a strong subject.....

    Regards :D
  11. Timoris
    Offline

    Timoris New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Holy Bear, Canada
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +26 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Have your film processed and burnt to CD. Don't bother spending to develop, it is cheaper this way and the scans will be much higher quality than with a prosumer scanner.
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  12. thebasedsloth
    Offline

    thebasedsloth New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    46
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Glen Burnie, Maryland
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +46 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    I should probably get 'aprosummer' scanner then!
    Another question; Would it be cheaper to develop it myself? Is it worth going through the trouble or should i just pay someone 5 bucks to do it?
  13. Timoris
    Offline

    Timoris New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Holy Bear, Canada
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +26 / 0
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    I've looked through several options, and am speaking specifically for my situation.

    Since my parents had their own dark room back in the 60ies, I have most if not all the gear already available (enlarger, tubs, trays, cutter, etc). The cost will go into the chemicals and paper.

    You will need several different types of chemicals ranging from 10 to 20$. If you want to develop colour, you will need a different set, unless you're into the trippy cross-processing but I am getting off topic a little,.
    depending on the type of paper and specific LOOK and FEEL you are looking for (cotton, matt, glossy etc) packs of 25 sheets can range from 25$ to well over 100$. These are special photosensitive papers, not the same you would use in a printer.

    It is also very important to note that you can only develop Black and White in a red light environment as B&W film is only sensitive to Green and Blue. For colour, you will need TOTAL darkness, the slightest of light leaks could break and entire roll. So you will need experience.

    All in all, for me, it costs more to develop on my own than to just Process the film and have the rolls burnt on CD (Again, prosumer scanners would give sub part quality compared to having a Lab burn it on CD for you), then having them printed out for 25¢ to 67¢

    You wouldn't develop for cost saving, you would develop for fun, control and experience gain.

    If you do decide to go the route of building your own dark room, here are some links for you:

    Quick start Guide:
    How to Build A Darkroom

    Materials:
    Darkroom - B&H Photo Video

    Remember, those labs develop a good amount of pictures every week, enough for them to afford having a low cost as they buy in bulk and have big machinery (well, those that I have seen are twice the size of an office photocopier) which makes processing MUCH faster. However, not all labs are created equal and if you wish the Process and Develop black and white film, many labs have to send your rolls out as the chemicals used for B&W are different than Colour.
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  14. Derrel
    Online

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    29,282
    Likes Received:
    10,174
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    USA
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +10,498 / 2
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Sw1tchFX--how does one go about getting that totally awesome hiking-man-icon-inside-of-black-rectangle-with-white-numerals thingie???
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Sw1tchFX
    Offline

    Sw1tchFX New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Messages:
    7,500
    Likes Received:
    477
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Gallery:
    Ratings:
    +477 / 0
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Richard Photo Lab.

    If you enjoy spending hours in front of the computer frustrated by scanning software and waiting than by all means scan yourself. I send my film out to RPL and they do just about perfect work, every time. I never have streaks, marks, spots, or scratches on my film because they use a dip-n-dunk process instead of running through a belt machine, and your photos go through about 3 people before they get back to you in order to make sure everything is perfect. I've never gotten scans back from them and thought "oh...". The proof is in the pudding, the first 3 pages of my blog link below are entirely film, mostly done by RPL. Bear in mind though, the best results are with pro films like Ektar, Portra, and 400h (which I still recommend shooting at 1/2 box speed)

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

first time shooting film

,

kodak funsaver light leaks