Fisheye and Macro lenses?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by SariLeigh, Jul 7, 2008.

  1. SariLeigh

    SariLeigh TPF Noob!

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    I was going to post this thread in beginners but I figured I was better off asking people who have more experience. I have an Olympus OM-1, and I'd like to get two additional lenses for it, a macro and a fisheye. However I don't know too much about purchasing/picking out lenses, so I need some help.
    1. it can't be a digital lense, right? Because I don't have a digital camera.
    2. The OM line was discontinued in '02, and the only well known professional dealer for Zuiko lenses (apparently the best for Olympuses) is B&H in NY. Does the brand of the lenses really matter, and if so, are there others that will fit an Olympus SLR?
    3. I'd prefer not to buy them from the B&H dealer, as I don't have that much money. I'd prefer to find cheaper lenses, used or not. Does anyone know where I can get them?
     
  2. SariLeigh

    SariLeigh TPF Noob!

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    Also, does the mm matter for a macro lense? Is there a certain size I should get in order to take pictures of insects?
     
  3. Mav

    Mav TPF Noob!

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    I know literally nothing about older Olympus film SLR series lenses. But if Olympus ever made a fisheye lens for their old film SLR cameras, that's what you'd want. You're correct that you would NOT want one of the digital lenses, because those lenses have a much smaller image circle that won't cover the full 35mm film frame. The result would be something like this which probably isn't what you want.

    For insects, something in the 100mm range would be better. The 50-60mm macro lenses force you to get too close for 1:1 macro which either disturbs your subject, or blocks your lighting.
     
  4. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    The OM-1 is an ALL manual ALL mechanical body. The OM-1, OM-2, OM-3, OM-4, and OM-10 use the Zuiko series of lenses (3rd party are available too of course) There are Zuiko 8mm, 16mm, 18mm, two 21mm, and two 24mm lenses available for your fisheye.

    I can recommend the Zuiko 90mm f/2.0 for your macro selection! Sweet glass! Best selection!

    For the fisheye's the 8mm is circular and it's "funness" is soon lost. The 16mm is an f/3.5 full-frame and very sweet! However the 21mm f/2.0 is probably your better buy! (much better I would have to say!)
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2008
  5. compur

    compur No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Right.

    The best brand is a matter of opinion but specialized lenses like macro and
    fisheye will generally be of good quality if you select either Zuiko or one of
    the major third party lens brands.

    There's always eBay. Lots of used Olympus lenses there. If you want a
    bargain I would suggest the Zuiko 50mm f/3.5 Macro. You can probably
    find one in mint or near-mint condition on eBay for under $100 and it's
    a very good lens. And, in general, non-Zuiko OM-mount lenses are quite
    inexpensive on eBay. Though something like a fisheye would likely not
    be so cheap.
     
  6. AndrewG

    AndrewG TPF Noob!

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    I owned an OM1n a while ago with a small range of Zuiko lenses which are great quality and stupidly cheap second-hand. Wonderful camera which gave me great results.
    I agree that a fisheye has limited appeal and really is a specialist optic which you'll probably pay too much for.
    A good macro, as was suggested, will give you much greater versatility and is usually the sharpest optic in a manufacturers range.
     

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