Flash questions

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Kevin Lindstrom, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. Kevin Lindstrom

    Kevin Lindstrom TPF Noob!

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    I am using a Nikon D50 and am real new to DSLR and no experience with SLR.

    If I buy an add on bounce/zoom flash lense can this flash be used in the autofocus setting on my lense and camera?

    Will the bounce/zoom flash create a brighter flash than the cameras built in flash?

    Also will a bounce/zoom that looks like it is from a regular film SLR work on my digital SLR?
     
  2. auer1816

    auer1816 TPF Noob!

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    Yes, it should. The way mine works is that once the lens is focused, the flash setting will pick it up and adjust accordingly.

    Absolutely. It will also make your batteries last longer, give you better flash coverage, sync with faster shutter speeds, and give you more control over your photos.
     
  3. Groupcaptainbonzo

    Groupcaptainbonzo TPF Noob!

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    If the flash / strobe light is built and designed to be fully compatable with your camera, then you can use it fully automatic and the camera /flash will do the sums. Although you may want to play about with the settings once you get comfortable with the setup.

    It should be a lot more powerful than the built in version although you will have to compare "Guide numbers" to be sure.
     
  4. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The idea behind bounce flash is produce more flattering light. Bouncing it softens it by enlarging it and moves it away from the camera for better modeling. Truthfully, you should never use an on-camera flash - ever for any reason. If on-camera flash is the only way I can get a shot then I will forego the shot. Here's an example of bounce flash - a plain old family snapshot.

    [​IMG]

    Notice that the light is soft and surrounds the subject. Shadows are soft and pleasing rather than sharp. There is no glare, no red eye, no deer-in-the-headlights look. You can see from the shadow on the child's neck that the light source is coming from his right and high. I held the flash gun at arms length to the side and pointed it at the ceiling between me and the subject. You wouldn't get this kind of lighting with a flashgun attached to a camera.
     
  5. Kevin Lindstrom

    Kevin Lindstrom TPF Noob!

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    What are guide numbers and how do I make the comparisons?

    The flash I was going to try to use is a QUANTARAY SUNPAK QAF 6600 Flash. This flash is from a standard SLR camera and I hope I can use it on my Nikon d50
     
  6. Groupcaptainbonzo

    Groupcaptainbonzo TPF Noob!

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    The guide numbers are to do with the light emitted by the flash at full power. Based upon the amount of light , over a distance, using ISO/ASA 100 film . A bit daunting . But in essence, The higher the guide number, the brighter the flash. Typically a macro flash will be around 8 to 14. An on camera "Pop up" will be 10 to 15 ish. And the extra add on flash gun of which you speak will be at least 20 up to 60 odd, sometimes even more.
    The guide numbers may be found, usually in the hand book, and often in the title of the flash (eg, Minolta Auto 360 PX, has a guide number of 36. A Canon speed lite 580 EX, Has a guide number of 58. A Konica Minolta P-Flash 5600HS(D) has a guide of 56. etc ). Slightly at odds with the norm the quantray has a guide number around the 100 mark. It also has all the bits needed to bounce and to work fully automatically (Through The Lens (TTL) metering etc for the specified camera that it was intended for.
    FMWs post is a delightful image, and what he says has a certain ring of truth about it. But using the walk before you run technique. I would suggest that you get used to the camera and flash for a while before you go into remote triggered off camera stuff. It will be better than on the camera . but is a lot more complex. Start by using the flash on the camera, At first the camera will work out all the sums for you. As you get used to it you will start to do it for yourself. Then, as suggested, bounce it off a (white) ceiling (or it will pick up the colour of what ever surface it is bounced off, And remember the power of the flash required to cover not just the camera to subject. but the distance from the flash to the ceiling and the ceiling to the subject and back to the lens, not of course forgetting the inverse square law, where light diminishes as it spreads out over distance). Then you can take it off the camera using a dedicated lead (quite expensive, but well worth the money). But like I said lets just walk before running, have fun, enjoy and learn the basics first.
     

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