Flower?

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by petertalke, Jun 7, 2008.

  1. petertalke

    petertalke TPF Noob!

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    Anyone have any idea what this flower/bush is called? We had this in SoCal years back...it was an awesome plant...about 4 ft high...a version of a bottle brush, but called something else??? Japanese something? Maybe? If anyone knows...please let me know...we woudl love to find it again! Thanks! Enjoy the picture!

    www.talkephotography.com

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  2. soul.glo

    soul.glo TPF Noob!

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    Monkeypod (Samanea).
     
  3. petertalke

    petertalke TPF Noob!

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    Are you sure? I googled it and the Samanea looks like a Hawaiin plant/tree with pink flowers. Thanks for your help!
     
  4. soul.glo

    soul.glo TPF Noob!

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    Just looked it up as well. Thought it was the same, but it doesn't look like it. Sorry about that.
     
  5. soul.glo

    soul.glo TPF Noob!

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    Maybe a bottle brush tree flower???
     
  6. soul.glo

    soul.glo TPF Noob!

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    I don't know why, but this has been bugging me since you posted it. I finally found it. It's call Ohia Lehua.
     
  7. soul.glo

    soul.glo TPF Noob!

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    Actually, I think it's this one. LOL!
     
  8. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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  9. petertalke

    petertalke TPF Noob!

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    Not the Ohia flower...that one is from Hawaii and the leaves look different. We picked this one up on Orange County at nursery. I'm still searching! Thanks for any help!
     
  10. petertalke

    petertalke TPF Noob!

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    Found it!!! Finally!!

    Metrosideros kermadecensis 'Tahiti' - Dwarf Pohutukawa [​IMG][​IMG]
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    [2nd Image] [​IMG][​IMG]Habit and Cultural InformationCategory: ShrubFamily: Myrtaceae (Myrtles)Origin: New Zealand (Australasia)Evergreen: YesFlower Color: Orange RedBloomtime: SpringSynonyms: [Metrosideros villosa 'Tahiti']Height: 2-4 feet Width: 2-4 feetExposure: Full SunSeaside: YesIrrigation Req.: Medium Water NeedsWinter Hardiness: 20-25° F * Poisonous Plant Information
    [​IMG]Metrosideros kermadecensis 'Tahiti' (Dwarf Pohutukawa) - This small shrub has neat gray-green thick rounded leaves and clusters of orange-red flowers. It was selected from Metrosideros kermadecensis for its compact growth (to 3 ft tall and as wide ), and for its free flowering habit. Scattered flowers appear on the bush through much of the year with the heaviest bloom in February, March and April . Butterflies, birds and insects are attracted to the attractive orange/scarlet blooms which appear in masses of puffs covering the bush. As with other Metrosideros, this cultivar is tolerant of salt spray and is useful in seaside plantings. Plant in sunny locations in well draining soils with moderate irrigation. This is an excellent choice for large pots on patios, terraces and around pools or on steps. After flowering, seed can begin to develop and in young plants it is a good practice to prune these seed heads and discard them to encourage new growth. Metrosideros kermadecensis is often included in with Metrosideros collina var. villosa, which grows on Polynesian islands but Metrosideros kermadecensis come from Sunday Island in the Kermadec Islands - a South Pacific island chaiin 500 miles north of New Zealands North Island. The description above is based on our research and observations of this plant growing in our nursery and garden. We would appreciate hearing from anyone who has additional information or disagrees with what we have written. [​IMG]
     

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