flowout on negative?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by robert grinten, Jul 29, 2008.

  1. robert grinten

    robert grinten TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello,
    I have a question about analog photography,
    This is a zoom of one photo of the results of a fuji 400h filmroll.
    [​IMG]
    the colorstreams that are blown out on the picture; is this of not storing my film at the right temperature? or is this a lens problem?

    i had it with 4 years over date films but this result is of a just bought filmroll, exept it was 35 degrees this day before i shot pictures i hope thats the reason but if anybody is sure about it, please let me know,
    Best regards robert van der grinten.
     
  2. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I don't remember ever seeing something like this before. Could it also be the scanner?

    Things that come to mind are water condensation in the lens or on the film. It almost looks like a fingerprint :D Something on the scanner glass? Pretty weird stuff man.
     
  3. Moglex

    Moglex TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2008
    Messages:
    578
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Whitstable
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Deleted - Incorrect.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2008
  4. chris

    chris TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2003
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Scotland
    It's Newton's rings - nothing to do with the negative being damp - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_rings for an expanation. It tends to happen when two smooth surfaces are in close, but not perfect, contact

    I take it that you scanned the negative in a flat bed scanner with a glass platen. Try turning the negative over and rescanning.
     
  5. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Messages:
    3,296
    Likes Received:
    465
    Location:
    Hell's Kitchen, New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Chris has explained the coloured contour-like lines perfectly, so all I'll add is that you may be able to reduce the problem by scanning with the emulsion side of the film against the glass.

    Edit: Then I noticed that chris had that covered as well ("Try turning the negative over and rescanning.") Oh well.

    If you are referring to the density changes in the lower part of the neg, then that could be caused by out-of-date film but it is very difficult to judge because of the Newton's Rings. If the problem isn't the Newton's Rings, then can you rescan the film to show just the problem you mean?

    Best,
    Helen
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2008
  6. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Oooo, I see. yeah that makes sense. Yeah, you're not supposed to put the negs flat on the glass. Isn't there a neg-tray that comes with your scanner? Like:


    [​IMG]


     
  7. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Lol nice use of the screen as a negative backlight :)

    You are but if it's anything like my negative holder then it is thin and the curve of the negative is enough to cause it to touch the platten.
    Thanks to the OP for bringing this up. I always thought this was a drying mark in my first and second development since these are the only ones I ever scanned myself, and never bothered to query the minds here. If this is right then flipping the negatives will get rid of it :)
     
  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
  9. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Messages:
    3,296
    Likes Received:
    465
    Location:
    Hell's Kitchen, New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Focal Point sell AN glass ready cut for many scanners.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  10. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Japan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I have 8 or 10 of these from different devices and I'm always thinking they're too thick. Thickness can cause shadows and/or reflection on the edge of the image area. I don't get any from the last several scanners I've had but before that I did. :( The translucent ones are the worst!. They put an amber rim all around the negs. :( Here's the one in the above photo:


    [​IMG]


    It's the same on both sides and holds the negs or transparencies super flat too - really tight fit. The anti-newtonian glass that Helen's talking about sounds like the way to go actually! ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2008

Share This Page