Fluorescence

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by JeannetteK, Sep 3, 2007.

  1. JeannetteK

    JeannetteK TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jasper, Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I have some concerns about lighting. The only place right now to set up a studio is in my basement. The basement is a walkout into the backyard. So there are several large windows and a sliding glass door.

    However, the ceiling lighting is fluorescent. I do have the capability of turning on/off sections of light. If I turn off lights in the section I want to use as the studio. Not enough light will come from the windows.

    Any suggestions on my lighting issue besides the fluorescent ceiling lights? Will a FL-D filter help any at all if I leave the lights on? Or do I need to invest in some lighting?
     
  2. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Colour temperature correction can be done on any digital camera, although with fluorescent lights it's harder than most. Any light source can give you a reasonably white light. What can't be corrected for is multiple lights. If the lights are on the window should be closed and visa versa.

    The other thing that matters is light quality. By fluorescent lights I normally think of the long tubes. If that gives you the light quality you want then by all means. By quality (not sure if this is the right word) I mean look at the shadows your subject casts.

    Beyond that maybe you can rig up some studio lights using powerful halogens, or if you have the capital go for flash units.
     
  3. JeannetteK

    JeannetteK TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jasper, Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks Garbz! I'll have to try a few things and see how the lighting comes out in the photos.
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,346
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Having a studio is all about controlling light. Overhead lights are not the kind that give a flattering look to portraits. You say you don't have a full understanding of lighting. This is something you really need to understand if you want to be a photographer. It's the number one principal of photography.

    Photo = light.

    If you plan to do portraiture, you not only have to learn about capturing light (exposure), but also about controlling it, of which there are a myriad of ways.
     
  5. JeannetteK

    JeannetteK TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jasper, Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks Matt! I guess I should have phrased that differently. I meant difference between wattage and strobe vs cont. I do understand that light is what makes a photo.
     
  6. RyanLilly

    RyanLilly No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1,478
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    St. Louis, Missouri, USofA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    If you don't mind a bit of extra heat, Halogen work lights come cheap at most hardware stores/home improvement centers. you can find anything from 300 watts on adjustable stands, to smaller~100watt or so that have clamps. Hell even a few of those $5 aluminum clip lights w /flood bulb can get you started.

    Its possible to get great results, but requires a lot more experimentation, bouncing off walls, shooting light through a bed sheet to defuse it, etc. a casual shooter, personally I enjoy working like this, I find it fun, but quite time consuming.

    Just a few hints, Typically, the more powerful the source is, the softer it looks. If you combine different types of fixtures keep the lamp type(halogen incandescent, fluorescent-note color temp differences) the same.
    Also If you use Halogen work lights, remove the cage from the front because they do cast light shadows.
     
  7. RacePhoto

    RacePhoto TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    562
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I think that if you try various lighting methods, fluorescent will come in last. Hot lights (continuous, that's why they are hot) in the middle. And flash will win for overall control, color and quality.

    Right off, fluorescent lights cycle and get brighter and dimmer. You may not see it, but the camera does. It will drive you crazy! Also the colors are strange. However you can buy daylight balanced tubes, which is nice. Some call "daylight" 5000K and some say their tubes are 5500K.

    Incandescent bulbs get hot. You can color balance for their light easier than tubes, and they don't flicker as much, so it doesn't show in the photos.

    Flash turns out to be the winner, over the long run. They are usually Daylight already.

    Read About It Here: http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetc...id=00Futx&tag=

    Since it's a studio and not on the move, you can hard wire your flash units, so they all flash together and not have to pay for IR triggers or radio controlled strobes. Plain old wire, works fine, and is cheap. You will need a flash slave trigger so you don't have all sort of wires coming out of the camera, but one will set off, all the other strobes.

    If you use mixed light sources, they should all be the same color temperature, unless you want to create differences in the colors.
     
  8. JeannetteK

    JeannetteK TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jasper, Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks RyanLilly and RacePhoto! I'll have to print that article for further reading.

    My BF put in fluorescent lights throught out most of the house to save money. Of course in the basement where I want to use space are fluorescent ceiling lights.
     

Share This Page