Forcing Perspective

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by nutthick, Jul 5, 2004.

  1. nutthick

    nutthick TPF Noob!

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    I have a photo to take for a website of a metalic rectangular box (exciting I know). It's an isometric shot, but I would like to stretch the perspective of the box, so there is slightly more emphasis on the detail of the end nearer the camera, but without loosing too much detail of the distant top of the box. It this something I should be attempting in camera, or is this more of a Photoshop job? Either way can someone please give me an idea of how to achieve it.

    Thanks
     
  2. rangefinder

    rangefinder TPF Noob!

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    Since you already have the image it lookslike you're into Photoshop to get the desired result.

    Creat a layer using the image.

    Next is to go into EDIT or LAYERS (can't remember which) and select TRANSFORM. This will give you several options such as Scale, Distort, Perspective, etc. One of them should get you on the right track.

    In Photoshop there are frequently several ways to obtain the same result. I'm sure someone will be able to add more to this.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    You could use your widest lens and get fairly close to the front of the box. You may have to stop down and use a tripod to get enough DOF for the entire box to be in focus when you get close like this.
     
  4. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I'm not sure I understand exactly what you want, but it sounds like a job for a veiw camera to me.
     
  5. molested_cow

    molested_cow No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    he's saying that you need a wide angle lens, means you will have to either buy or borrow one.

    Another thing I can think of is by using large aperture to increase the sense of depth, so areas other than the focused will burr out.
     
  6. nutthick

    nutthick TPF Noob!

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    I've been messing around a bit since I last posted and have achieved something approaching what I want. Basically I used a low camera angle, shooting onto the corner of the box. With the camera locked off I focussed on the closest face for one shot and then focussed on the distant detail (top of the box) for the next. Then in Photoshop overlaid the two images so everything was in focus (well more or less, still need some fiddling). The low angle gave me the rediculous deep look I needed, with the 'everything in focus' working well.

    Thanks for your help everyone.
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Rather than combining two images...can't you just set the aperture to it's smallest setting to get maximum DOF?
     

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