Freezer or fridge?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by panocho, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. panocho

    panocho TPF Noob!

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    Here a pretty basic question: what's the proper place to store film, the freezer or just the fridge is enough?
    I'm talking about both out-of-date film and already shot film (which for different reasons I cannot develop right after shooting, but still have to wait a while... strange things, I know!).
    Of course, I think on normal kitchen refrigerators, not any special one! Which part should I use better to keep the film (so far, I have them in the fridge)?
    thanks, you cool people!
     
  2. voodoocat

    voodoocat ))<>(( Supporting Member

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    I've always stored film in the fridge and never had any issues. I'd imagine the only time you would think about using a freezer is when you're storing film for use in a few years. Make sure you take the film out and let it thaw for an hour or so at room temperature.
     
  3. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Pro films are meant to be stored in the fridge until use, and then processed within 24 hours. Consumer films can be thought of as "green" or "not ripe." They are designed with the idea they may spend months (or longer) in a camera.

    I've heard of some folks who won't use film until it has been frozen. Hmm...
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    The fridge is best for storage, but do bear in mind that you shouldn't keep films in the fridge right up until you use them. This is for two reasons:

    1) Condensation
    2) Sprocket engagement and film breakage issues

    Take them out at least one hour before use and get them to the same temperature as the camera and the environment.

    Films should never ever be frozen as they are prone to breaking at very low temperatures. I've managed this in Russia before and it's very difficult to retrieve all the shards of shattered film from the inside of your camera.

    Don't ever use over-date film - throw it away.

    The difference between pro and normal film is usually only the portion of the big reel it is cut from. The pro is centre cut and therefore has a perfectly even coating of emulsion, whereas the normal and budget films are closer to the edge and may not be completely perfect. It still comes off the same big old reel though. A piece of acetate laced with emulsion does not "ripen".

    Rob
     
  5. spike000

    spike000 TPF Noob!

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    Fridge.
     
  6. voodoocat

    voodoocat ))<>(( Supporting Member

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    :lol: That's bull****. Film stored in the fridge past the expiration date will be perfectly fine.
     
  7. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

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    Rob,

    Are you saying that you've had film that was once stored in the freezer shatter AFTER it had returned to room temperature for use in the camera?

    Dave
     
  8. panocho

    panocho TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for all your contributions!
    To deepen a little on this...
    do you really think it neccesary to throw away refrigerated out-of-date film!? In my completely amateur opinion I would go with voodoocat: no problem, use it! why not? is there something that could REALLY be noticed in the results?...
    and, would you say that all this applies exactly the same to already shot film?
     
  9. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    nope - it just shatters when it's cold, but I would think that it wouldn't be a good idea to freeze it anyway.
     
  10. spike000

    spike000 TPF Noob!

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    [sarcasm] NO NO NO NO.

    Film degrades with time - particularly when exposed but also beforehand.

    This is why all professional film advises developing immediately.

    Also why older print colour film looks magenta.

    Why not keep it in your oven and dip it in paint thinner as well - sure that would do no harm to it!!!!!!!! (sarcasm)

    If you buy out of date film your results will not be as good as the emulsion is not as designed and the risk of the film being abused (see above) is greater.

    If you want to save money find it elsewhere. Your camera is merely a lightbox - what records the information is far more important.



    Spike
     
  11. Jovian

    Jovian TPF Noob!

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    The rare times that I shoot film anymore, it's usually in a Holga, or black and white, artistic stuff. Honestly, I buy almost all expired film now. The camera store keeps it refrigerated, and I keep it refrigerated, and I have never had a problem with it. As long as we aren't talking years after expiration... it's not an issue if refrigerated, the cold slows down the chemical reaction enough to keep the film good, be it pro film, or consumer film. Try it...you might be pleasently suprised. It's cheaper too....
     
  12. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I'm a Kodak user... LOVE the yellow boxes. Kodak pro film and ameture films are two different products, and not from the same reel. Of course, film doesn't acutally "ripen," but pro films can be "thought of" as ripe. They are brought to their optimum performance for color, and then refrigerated to slow to process until use. I do advise allowing film to return to room temperature before opening the package.
     

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