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Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by Machine May, Oct 2, 2004.

  1. Machine May

    Machine May TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]
     
  2. jadin

    jadin The Mad Hatter

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    Too much of a snapshot. It's missing both of their faces. As well as whatever interaction is going on.
     
  3. 2Stupid2Duck

    2Stupid2Duck TPF Noob!

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    Hate to say it, but I agree. You needed to be at the front and capture the emotion of both faces.
     
  4. Machine May

    Machine May TPF Noob!

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    Can't you tell from the picture that they're discussing the bycycle? If not, I wonder what I could have done to convey that... she's looking downat his bike, and he is too.
     
  5. Mike888

    Mike888 TPF Noob!

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    to me it looks like a quick snap shot. I dont feel anything from it.

    sorry.
     
  6. jadin

    jadin The Mad Hatter

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    One suggestion is to not look down on your subjects, even if you are taller. Get down to their level, it makes the viewer view them as an equal not as something you look down upon.
     
  7. Machine May

    Machine May TPF Noob!

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    Really? I've seen many, many photographs that looked down on the subject; how about the hoola girl, there's one right there...
     
  8. Alison

    Alison Swiss Army Friend Supporting Member

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    I think the angle just depends on the individual photograph. For this particlar one I think getting on their level and having the boy and bike turned toward the woman so that you can see at least some of the boy's face would have made a bigger impact. For me, portrait photography is stronger when you can get a sense of emotion from the subjects. Because I can't see the boys face I don't know if he's happy, sad, etc.
     
  9. Tuna

    Tuna Supermodel

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    It's hula. As in "Hula Hoop" - a recent post of mine.

    ("Sigh...") It's so nice to be remembered...

    Tuna
     
  10. John E.

    John E. TPF Noob!

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    another tip is to be aware of your background, which can easily make or break a picture. Your background does absoulty nothing for the picture and therefore becomes a distraction. Also try to straighten out the image in the viewfinder before clicking.

    The hula hoop picture is a great picture for many reasons. Tuna captured only what was essential to the photo. The tone and contrast were suberub. Tuna was able to catch motion, excitement and fun without even having to see the girls face which made it more interesting. And yes there are times to break the rules on very few occassions and the hula hoop was one of those times.

    We are all here to learn and enjoy, keep trying, honest critism can only make you better..
     
  11. hobbes28

    hobbes28 Incredible Supporting Member

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    Well said. I couldn't agree more.
     
  12. Machine May

    Machine May TPF Noob!

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    Who could forget? I showed that pic to my wife... it was really cool, and I don't usually like b/w pix. Were you upstairs looking out of a window by the way?

    I would agree with that if this was a traditional portrait that was "set up" but most of what I like when it comes to people is natural, impromptu photography, not stuff that's set up and "fake." When it comes to shooting people, I like capturing what the real moment is about, rather than making it up. Is that wrong or less "pure"?
     

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