? from a beginer

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by crazyfireman, Nov 25, 2008.

  1. crazyfireman

    crazyfireman TPF Noob!

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    Hi every one

    Ive had my Nikon d40x for about 10 months. I have the 18-55 and a 55-200 lens for it. I have been taking a lot of pic in auto and the programed modes. I am very comfortable with my camera but now i want to learn the other modes, I know I am not ready for the full manual mode so that leaves the A S or P modes. I was wondering which one I should move to next, I shoot mainly landscape and wildlife but do shoot anything that catches my eye.

    Thanks James
     
  2. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Before you start using the other modes, you may need to learn more about shutter speed, Aperture and ISO. Especially their relationship. Once you know more about them, learn how to apply your knowledge with the A/S mode with your camera.
     
  3. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    aperture priority is one of the most popular modes used on a camera so make the move to there first :)
    Its popular because aperture directly affects your depth of field in a shot (area of photo which comes out sharp - when focused properly of course) and as such lets you determine what in your photo will be in and out of focus - along with that it adjusts shutter speed on its own so its adaptable to changing lighting conditions far faster than you can alone.
    Basically a bigger aperture (Smaller f number) lets in more light and leads to a smaller depth of field - but allows for a faster shutter speed. A smaller aperture (bigger f number) lets in less light but allows for a greater depth of field - but of course with less light entering the camera shutter speeds have to be slower.
    ISO can let you boost shutter speeds by making the sensor more receptive to light, however the higher your ISO the more digital noise you will get in photos.


    For wildlife its a great mode since lighting can change very quickly - I recommend starting off with wider apertures (smaller f numbers) say in the f4-f5.6 area but practise is going to be what you need to see how the different values relate to different depths of field.
    Also note the distance from the camera to the subject is key as well, close up you need more depth of field than if your subject is further away - so you might need something like f8 closeup to a fox, whilst if he is in the distance f4 might be all that is needed.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The mode that you use, isn't really all that important. All else being equal, there is no difference between a shot taken in auto, manual, shutter or aperture priority. So even if you put the camera into manual and then adjust the settings until the 'needle' in centred to the --0--...you will probably get the same result as shooting in auto.

    So rather than worry about modes just yet...make sure you know and understand about how aperture, shutter speed and ISO work together to give you an exposure. Know that aperture largely controls the DOF, while shutter speed controls how motion is recorded. Then you can make the choice of what mode/settings would best suit your situation.
     

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