Full frame / Crops????

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by jemmy, Aug 30, 2006.

  1. jemmy

    jemmy TPF Noob!

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    Hi guys. Just hoping you can help me..... When talking about 'full frame' image sizes and 'crops' I'm a little confused and haven't found much information about it. So 12 x 18" is full frame - so nothing is cropped off my image when printed, I believe 12 x 8" is also full frame??? 8 x 10 is a crop, 11 x 14" is a crop.... How do I work out what sizes are full and crops?? Is there some sort of calculation or is it just set... Is 20x30 a crop...etc...???? Hopefully you talented people can steer me in the right direction... I'm a HUGE lover of close up portraits so I really gotta learn this stuff. Thanks, :heart: Jemma
     
  2. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    There are two different ways people use "full frame". When talking about a digital camera, a full-frame camera has the same size sensor as a 35mm film negative (1" x 1.5").

    When it comes to prints, there's a lot of variety in ratios. 35mm and most digital SLRs are 2:3 ratio. (4x6, 8x12, etc). Digital cameras that are geared after video technology have a 3:4 ratio. Medium format can be 1:1 (square), 6:7, 2:3, etc. Large format is often 4:5.
     
  3. Mihai

    Mihai TPF Noob!

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    I think that she asks which of the various formats are crops and which are full frame when it comes to printing. Also I assume that she talks about printing in 35mm. And then the answer is what you said: 2:3 ratio.
    So if the numbers are in the ratio of 2:3, that is if you divide the large one by the small one and the answer is 1.5, then it's full frame. If not, it's a crop. So 4x6 and 8x12 are full frames. 5x7 is a crop. And so on.

    M.
     
  4. JamesD

    JamesD Between darkrooms

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    Don't forget, you can also have a 1.5:1 (2:3) crop of an image which may or may not have been that aspect ratio to begin with. Cropping in general means to cut parts out.
     
  5. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    Its nice to know in advance what size prints you are most likely to print. If in doubt crop in the camera to leave enough for an 8x10 crop. If you leave the extra it usually is enough for other more exotic but standard crop ie 5x7 11x14.

    I try to shoot mine top to bottom full but leave enough for an 8x10 crop on ends since that is where the standard lab crops are made.
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    The interesting thing is that "standard lab sizes" tend to be 4x6, 5x7, 8x10, and 11x14. Do the math, each one is a different aspect ratio. 11x14 is close to 8x10, but still slightly different.
     
  7. jemmy

    jemmy TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everyone.... I THINK it's a little clearer. I use a canon350d slr so it looks like the ratio for print crops is 2:3!? x I will have to learn to leave space at least on the sides (thanks mysteryscribe!) while I'm shooting... I have an obsession with close-ups, so this could possibly kill me x
     
  8. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    leaving that space on the sides is the hardest thing for you to consistantly do. When my son in law was in training to take over the business, we thought he would never learn. Now that he has gone digital, it is still a problem again. Because he can fix most things. he is a little sloppy in his composition. That and he looks at too many forums galleries.
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    What's wrong with 4x6, 6x9, 8x12, 10x15, 12x18, 16x24, and 20x30 prints? These are available at any full service lab.
     
  10. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    as far as i know nothing but when you make a wedding album most often it is in 8x10 and you dont want to crop of a bride's ear so she can get an 8x10.

    True story so help me god. I shot a wedding with the bride and groome standing under one of those arches filled with flowers. I showed 4x6 proofs. When the mother picked it as her 'tabletop' pic I was happy.

    When it came back in the 8x10 'standard' easy to find frame size, that she chose, the top of the arch was missing. She just raised holy hell at me. I reprinted at 8x12 and she still raised holy hell. She would need to have the expensive frame made.

    From that day on I shot everything as if it was going to be made 8x10. Yes there is a little extra on the top and bottom or the side, but if I had to crop uncle Joe got to keep his right arm, and the aunt nobody liked was all in the picture. I always shoot to crop 8 X 10, habit of 35mm photographer at the end.

    I did love 6x6 when I started for that very reason. That's what someone should made a square digital.
     
  11. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I don't know where these people live that can't find ready made albums and frames in a 2:3 aspect ratio. My local Wallymart and it's competitors always stock 8x12 frames, and if I walk into my local Hobby Lobby/Michaels store they have a huge supply of ready made frames in all aspect ratios (even 2:5 for my Widelux). I have never had to have a custom frame made. There are about a billion frame and album sellers on the internet, and they all stock albums and frames for every aspect ratio I've ever heard of in all sorts of styles and price ranges. 35mm (2:3 ratio) has been around for almost 100 years now; it's time to stop the madness.
     
  12. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    I have never seen an 8x12" frame in a store. I've always custom built mine with americanframe.com.
     

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