Fungus

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by Greensill, Nov 1, 2005.

  1. Greensill

    Greensill TPF Noob!

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    I took this out on a walk the other day maybe about 11am...im new to manual photography (3 films developed so far) and i used a 1/15 shutter speed and an aperture to match, i think it came off pretty nicely. Is there anyways i could improve it next time that you can see? also does anyone know how i can focus in close to get good surface detail of something like this? thanks[​IMG]
     
  2. Raymond J Barlow

    Raymond J Barlow TPF Noob!

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    cool shot, and my advice would be to use a tripod.. to shoot manual, you need a shutter speed at least and high as the focal length of your lens. (as a rule) When i am in the forest, I rest my cam on a rock, or on my shirt in the dirt, and set up the shot,.. 1/2 to 3... 8 seconds, then use the self timer to fire the shutter.. @ 5 seconds.. to help reduce camera shake. One day I will get a tripod! Also, use a low ISO film, for less grain.. 200 max.. and try to fill your frame with your subject.

    Hope this helps!
     
  3. Greensill

    Greensill TPF Noob!

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    hey thanks for the feedback...what sort of result will i get with a longer shutter speed.....i used a tripod in this pic and i used the timer to fire the shutter. Is that what the grain is from then having the wrong kind of film in there?
     
  4. alexecho

    alexecho TPF Noob!

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    There isn't a 'wrong' type of film, most of the time. It's personal preferance up to a point, but a high iso setting gives you a much granier picture - comparitively faster shutter speeds though, if you want to shoot something that's moving and the light isn't too great. You need to pick and choose depending on circumstance and the effect you wist to achieve.
     
  5. Greensill

    Greensill TPF Noob!

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    Could anyone help me out filling the viewfinder with teh subject and being able to focus?
     
  6. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Do you want to fill the viewfinder with the tree bark? That would be a very nice shot of texture. :thumbup: Again - use your tripod. Your lens will dictate how close you can get to your subject, but you should be able to fill the frame here with no problem. Using the self-timer is a very good way to eliminate the possibility of camera shake with longer exposures. You're well on your way! :)
     

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