G1X dust in lens

Discussion in 'Canon Cameras' started by cool09, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. cool09

    cool09 TPF Noob!

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    Is there any way to clean this out? Not sure of the extent (ebay).


     
  2. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Send it in to repair shop.
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Pretty much all lenses have dust in them.
    Even brand new lenses.
    Some older lenses have lots of dust in them.

    It's not something that needs to be sent in for repair.
    Even if you do, expect to pay a pretty penny to have the lens cleaned.
     
  4. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Dust inside a lens usually won't have any noticeable impact on the image quality. If you have a heavy amount of dust then you can suffer a loss of contrast. But the dust won't show up in an image because the dust isn't located at a focus point (such as the sensor).

    If you take a photograph of any subject and just pick one particular point on that subject, light leaving that particular spot takes many paths (simultaneously) through the lens. Some of the light passes straight through the center of the lens. Some goes through the top or bottom or right or left sides of the lens... but the symmetric curvature of the lens means that all of those bits of light will be focused to the same point on the image sensor if they originated from the same position on the subject (presuming the subject was in focus). So of all of those paths... only one of them might intersect with that bit of dust and be blocked... all the rest pass through as if the dust isn't there (because those paths didn't intersect the dust). This is why the dust isn't really visible on the image (even though a fractionally tiny amount of light was blocked which causes a reduction in overall contrast... but so small that you wouldn't be able to notice it.)

    Get a LOT of dust build-up ... and now you might be blocking enough light that you can finally notice a loss of contrast.

    In general... don't worry too much about dust unless it's actually on the sensor.
     

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