Getting fed up now!

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by PlasticSpanner, Nov 14, 2005.

  1. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    I've been back 3 times now to photograph this but I'm still not happy!
    I know there's some way to get exactly what I'm looking for but seem to be missing it each time. I want the Millstone to look peacefull, lonely and remote (which it is) but can't seem to get the right angle on it.

    The first is what I think is the closest I've got to date (out of 17 shots now!). Is there something wrong in the composition or lighting that seems to be making it too vibrant? Shot with a 50mm lens at F16, 1/125 on ISO 200 film.

    [​IMG]

    I have this next shot taken lying on the ground but I think it lacks the lonely, remote feeling. It just doesn't seem to portray what I want it to. (I know I'm only supposed to post 1 at a time but I would like advice on alternative angles please.)

    [​IMG]

    Both image are OTE and all comments appreciated. This is starting to frustrate me now & I need more opinions.
    Bothe images are as scanned with no adjustments so far. I'd like to get this right without PS if possible.
    Thanks!:thumbup:
     
  2. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Blue sky and sun are too happy.
    Try it with an overcast - the blueish tint you should get will also help.
    I'd also try getting more of the landscape behind into the shot.
     
  3. JonMikal

    JonMikal TPF Noob!

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    i was thinking the same and maybe include the base with forground...just enought to keep emphasis on the stone though.
     
  4. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My immediate thoughts, too.
    You can only express remoteness and lonliness if you show how much room there is around it, with nothing else in it. It is very close now, which evokes feelings of contact, nearness (naturally), so you can't get the feeling that it is peaceful and remote.

    And yes, Graham is very right: the weather is quite cheerful. Probably too cheerful for the emotion that you would like to evoke with this photo?
     
  5. Corry

    Corry Flirtacious and Bodacious Supporting Member

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    I'm gonna have to agree that it's too 'happy'. I was going to say that I'd love to see this in B/W, and more contrast, but you said you wanted to not use PS!

    Compositionally, it kinda bothers me that the lower corner or the cement slab is cut off.
     
  6. fightheheathens

    fightheheathens TPF Noob!

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    i think this could also benifite from evening or morning sun.
    judging by the shaddows of the trees in the backround, the sun is pretty high. i think with this sun you are getting too much harshness in the colors, they arent warm. there are no shaddows or at least no extreem shaddows which i think could really benifite here, give a sence of depth, and if you play the angle right, shaddows could really add a sence of lonelieness here.

    also the sky is too happy.
    id go for a heavy low cloud cover day right at sunset (so the sun is below the clouds) in black and white.
     
  7. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    OK so one of the shots to try again would be slightly higher to get more background/less sky and further back (or wider lens) to include the base. Moving further back from the stone will increase the space around it. Should I still be looking at thirds or maybe something else? I have a few of these angles already & if it's OK I could post som small thumbnails to show what I've tried so far.


    I have some shots from an overcast day which I thought would work before I took this lot but they look very drab and dull, almost miserable!

    B&W might be the way to go with this maybe even in moonlight? I have 3 rolls in my bag so I'll give that a go too.

    Thanks for all your suggestions guys!:thumbup:
     
  8. JonMikal

    JonMikal TPF Noob!

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    sure, feel free to post other perspectives.
     
  9. Onyx

    Onyx TPF Noob!

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    i think it need more backround. maybe try a wider lense. also if you can pick an angle that has less bushes or trees that may help.
     
  10. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Placing objects on the intersecting thirds (Rule of Thirds) gives a feeling of calmness and tranquility - almost placidness. This is not the feeling you are trying to get, I think. Loneliness and isolation are uncomfortable emotions so you want a compositional structure that promotes this.
    I would consider having the stone on the left side of the image if this is practical. Left quarter in the bottom half. More sky will also help.
    When you are going for an emotion in an image you have to consider that emotion.
    Is it a positive emotion/feeling or a negative one?
    If positive you start with positive colours - red, yellow, orange. Warm, bright, cheerful.
    Negative - blues and purples. Cold, distant.
    Green is generally neutral.
    Tertiary colours are generally drab and depressing.
    Black and white can give a cold feel if the lighting is right.
    Similarly you want a composition that reflects the mood.
    If you want lonely and isolated then you need to make the subject look lonely and isolated. Making the subject look small and insignificant in relation to the picture is a good place to start - or thinking of ways to isolate it.
    The composition needs to be a negative one: subject out of balance or moving out of frame - to the left and down are the negative directions.
    Any help?
     
  11. fightheheathens

    fightheheathens TPF Noob!

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    man that helped even me :mrgreen:
     
  12. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    Graham:- I had to write that down in my note book. There's so much info I'd never remember all of it!:D Thanks!:thumbup: I definately owe you a pint next time I see you!:lol:


    OK so after fighting my PC which decided to have a tantrum over running PS I've managed to compile 12 of the more contrasting images. There are some not shown that were just bracketed with slight differences in exposure so I've left them out. Again, all these are OTE and if you can help it's very appreciated.

    [​IMG]

    I'll be going back up there in a few days to try again but with an overcast sky (shouldn't be too hard this week in the UK!:grumpy: )

    My Mother-in-Law thinks I'm losing my memory & that's why I keep photographing the same thing over & over!:lol:
     

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