Glacier National Park trip, need suggestions on equipment.

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by sambrody44, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. sambrody44

    sambrody44 TPF Noob!

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    First of all let me introduce myself. My name is Sam as you could probably guess by my user name. I got my camera as a Graduation present and I'm still a beginner with only a couple months of experience.

    So I'm going on this trip and would love to bring my camera (Canon Rebel XTi) with me. I would like to get a new back pack thats small enough to hike with that I could still tote my camera gear and some other hiking gear with me in. So I would like to know what you guys think is a bag that would meet that criteria.

    I am also looking into purchasing a new lens for this trip. Right now I have the kit lens my camera came with a 18-55 f/5.6. I'm looking into the Canon 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III EF Lens for more zoom in shooting wildlife and the such.

    I would also like to know if there are any other suggestions for accessories you think I should get for the trip, filters or hoods etc.

    Thanks in advanced,
    Sam
     
  2. Montana

    Montana TPF Noob!

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    Get a circular polarizer or a graduated neutral density filter. You will have the opportunity to get some amazing lanscape shots. Get a cheapy tripod too if funds are too limited. Or a monopod since it sounds like you may be hiking. I envy you for this trip. The graduated ND filter will allow you to get a more proper exposure of both sky and ground in your landscape shots and the polarizer will help with water reflections..etc. Be sure and shoot some landscapes at your widest end of the lens. If possible, borrow or rent an ultra-wide for the trip.

    Derrick
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome aboard Sam, I've moved this into a better section for you.

    I've found that a lot of 'camera' backpacks are good for toting camera gear but not a whole lot of other stuff. Some have good compartments for regular stuff but then don't leave you a lot of room for photo gear....but that might be OK as it doesn't sound like you have too much gear...not yet anyway.

    I use and recommend Lowepro camera bags. I have several, including a backpack and they are made really well. The backpack is great for hiking because it's easy to carry...but it's a pain in the @ss to take off and open up when you want to change lenses or something like that. A 'sling' style bag would be more convenient for that, but not quite as good for a long hike. A shoulder style bag is easy to access but a pain to carry for a long time...for some people anyway.

    As for recommended gear...that really depends. I would recommend a circular polarizer filter. I love using those when shooting outdoors. A tripod would also be a good idea....but they can be a pain to hike with. My backpack has a spot for a tripod but I have a separate tripod bag that I carry. When hiking, I'll usually take my mono pod and use it as a walking stick. You could also look at an actual walking/hiking pole that has a camera mount screw on the top.

    As for a lens...a longer lens is good for wildlife. The 75-300mm isn't a 'great' lens but about as good as your 18-55mm lens. It should be OK when the light is good during the day.

    Personally, when going to the mountains, I really like a wide angle lens. 18mm on your camera is a little wide...but not nearly wide enough for me. Before my last trip to the mountains, I got the Canon 10-22mm lens. It's fantastic but it was rather expensive. You might consider the Sigma 10-20mm lens, people seem to like it and it's a fair bit less expensive thant the Canon.
     
  4. sambrody44

    sambrody44 TPF Noob!

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    But the 75-300 should be okay for shooting wildlife and sports, for a beginner that is? I don't have a huge budget when it comes to getting new lenses.
     
  5. photo28

    photo28 TPF Noob!

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    the 75-300mm lens should be fine, I'm not sure how much that costs or if you have already but the Sigma 70-300mm APO Telephoto Super Macro II lens is pretty cheap and its good quality.
     
  6. anubis404

    anubis404 TPF Noob!

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    If you're going to be outdoors and shooting landscapes, I suggest a wide angle lens. I went on a hiking trip with just my kit lens and the 18 wasn't quite wide enough for me, especially if you want amazing clouds in your photos. However, if you're planning on shooting birds, deer, squirrels, or whatever animal comes your way, then a telephoto is a must. It really depends on what you're planning to do.


    A circular polarizer is also a must for outdoor shots. I don't know what I'd do without mine. They're usually pretty cheap on Ebay, I got mine for about $15, and it works great. You don't have to blow $60 on a filter.

    Since I like to hike, I know that carrying a tripod can be a pain in the @$$. A monopod would be better, however they only reduce up and down shake, not side to side shake. For that reason, I would recommend shooting hand-held. If you're planning on shooting in the daytime, there should be plenty of light.

    As for a backpack, It really depends. What you could do is get a regular hiking backpack of your choice, and carry a small shoulder camera bag in addition. For under $100, you're not really going to get something decent for hiking that will carry your camera gear AND your hiking crap. So unless its a short hike and all you need is some food and water, I would recommend a regular hiking bag with a small shoulder bag.
     
  7. sambrody44

    sambrody44 TPF Noob!

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    The 75-300mm is $200. I also saw the Sigma but I'm thinking that the $40 dollars more for the Canon is probably worth it, correct me if I'm wrong.

    Just to clarify, the 75-300mm will work with the XTi body?
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    They are both 'decent' for an entry level zoom. I have the Canon and haven't used the Sigma...but if $40 is a lot of money to you, then I wouldn't think that you would be disappointed with the Sigma. If not, go with the Canon.

    And Yes, any Canon EF lens will work on any Canon EOS camera....so you are OK there. If you buy an off-brand flash, it will work as long as you buy the ones that are listed as 'for Canon EOS/EF mount/Autofocus'.
     
  9. Easy_Target

    Easy_Target TPF Noob!

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    If you're only bringing the Canon w/ kit lens and the 70-300mm, I'd say just have the 70-300mm in a carry bag and stick that into your backpack. Pack your bag so that it's well equipped with things you'll need, but not so heavy that it will wear you out. Another option is to carry the 70-300mm lens in a waist pack in the front. I carry my 100-300mm AI-S lens in a lumbar pack attached at my waist.
     
  10. photo28

    photo28 TPF Noob!

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    Well, the $40 may be worth it, I'm not so sure. I've heard mixed reviews about the 70-300mm, some say its great, some say good for beginners, some say its terrible....
     
  11. sambrody44

    sambrody44 TPF Noob!

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    What about hoods? I don't really know much about them.
     
  12. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Lens hoods are great when shooting outdoors, the keep the sun off of the front lens element and they can also protect the front of the lens from hitting the ground or something. I recommend using a lens hood when you can.

    It can be a pain, however, to rotate a circular polarizing filter with a hood on.
     

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