GODOX Strobes

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by TiCoyote, Dec 20, 2017.

  1. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    11,382
    Likes Received:
    4,412
    Location:
    NoVA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    adding weight the the base of a stand is better in that regard...


     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,230
    Likes Received:
    15,104
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Good video. The eVOLVE 200 flash unit looks very interesting.

    But back to the monolights: If you want to use studio-style flash outdoors, the high speed flash synch capability would be extremely useful! Being trapped at 1/250 or slower in the summer months is a PITA at times. The ability to jack the shutter speeds way high, in order to shoot at f/2.8 or even at f/1.8 for blown-out defocus on backgrounds would be nice, and that capability would open up creative possibilities galore, so high-speed flash capable monolights would be useful for a wedding outdoor location. Also, being able to control background brightness through fast shutter speeds would be another useful capability HSS monolights would give you.

    Turtle base light stands (Avenger, or Matthews, or other brands) AKA "C-Stand" style are hard to knock over. Heavy, yes. But the best on unlevel ground, or when real stability is desired. Also...you can clamp-in boom arm weights to the base and make 'em very,very bottom-heavy.
     
  3. TiCoyote

    TiCoyote TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    New England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The AD200 offers HSS up to 1/8000
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,230
    Likes Received:
    15,104
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The AD200 needs this Bowens S-type mounting ring to accept Bowens-mount modifiers, but it's under $20. https://www.amazon.com/Godox-Bracke...rd_wg=w4aj0&psc=1&refRID=ETDX5BMHRTKTTTPHV1FE

    This is _NOT_ the same thing as having a monolight with a modeling lamp in it...this is still shooting in the dark, or shooting blind, as with speedlights. There is nothing that compares with full-time, real-time seeing the lighting effects of modeling lamps in the flash units. But...sometimes that's not needed. If you want to do real,serious portraits using studio flash units, then you want studio flash units, so you can literally SEE where the flash units, plural, are shining, at all times, before the shot is fired. At times, that's critical. At other times, not.

    I guess I am referring back to your OP, where you mention one thing (portraits), but then later, I found out you do weddings. Different products would be better for different, specific flash uses and different shooting locations. Studio flash units and modern, hybrid speedlights are different tools. Buying recommendations could potentially be tailored to what,exactly, you want the products to be the very best at. And on what the user criteria are! Weight? Battery or not? Portability? etc
     
  5. TiCoyote

    TiCoyote TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    New England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Yep, I hadn't thought about the modeling light. That's pretty huge. Back to the drawing board.
     
  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,230
    Likes Received:
    15,104
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The modeling lights show you, at all times, where the lights are shining, and they let the subject sort of sense the light as well (mainly for models). I think modeling lights are pretty important for eye catchlight placement, and for nose shadow placement, and for getting that just-right positioning of the lights. In Rembrandt lighting, in loop lighting, and in split lighting, the exact placement of the main light in relation to the face is a huge deal. In darker, low-key type setups, or when using smaller modifiers, or when lighting backgrounds, or when using a honeycomb grid on a metal reflector from 5 inches to 22 inches in diameter.

    Literally raising or lowering the main light by two to three inches, can make or break many portraits. Modeling lights allow the photographer to get the lighting exactly as is desired,and show him or her when the subject has moved out of optimal lighting.

    Being able to literally see the lighting effects you are creating, as you move the light around and up and down, is a huge benefit. Having a modeling light in every flash head reminds you, constantly, exactly where the main, fill, background, and hair lights are shining. In tight quarters, where the background is narrow, or when you have to have the subject and the camera lined up within a narrow range of places, being able to see the background light's beam spread at all times, can make things easier and better. Shooting blind, with a speedlight, also means that eyeballs often have that dark, black, mostly colorless look, whereas with bright modeling lights, the pupil is closed down, and the colored part of the eye shows more, and it looks different than that dark, cow-eyeball look that screams, "This photo was shot with speedlights in a dim room!"

    Yes, modeling lights in studio flash units are, indeed, a huge issue, and in my opinion, a huge asset.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Messages:
    3,117
    Likes Received:
    781
    Location:
    Western New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I never accounted for these issues when shooting with speedlights. But now that I have monolights I completely agree and see what you’re saying.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,230
    Likes Received:
    15,104
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Here's a good article published by the Sekonic light and flash meter company. The Five Basic Portrait-Lighting Setups | Photography How To Articles – What's Your Specialty? Photographer

    As they mention, their diagrams assume the use of parabolic reflectors on the lights (bowl-shaped metal reflectors in sizes like like 5-,7-,8.5-,10-,11-,and 16-inch, the kind of parabolic or "pan" reflectors that studio flash units have been fitted with since the 1940's), but the light placements and the shadow placement results are also applicable for shooting with diffused lighting achieved by using umbrellas or softboxes.

    One of _the_ single biggest advantages of a real studio flash head is the ease of mounting a honeycomb grid and a diffuser and a barn door set on a light that has a 7-inch or 11-inch metal reflector with a good modeling light inside the setup. This allows for exact, precise placement of a gorgeous hair-light, or cheek-light or whatever, from very close distance to the subject. This avoids that "too bright!", raw-light look of a speedlight that's sort of aimed toward the subject to provide some separation or drama. The full range of light shaping tools (grids,diffusers, gels,barn door sets,snoots,etc) that can be fitted onto a traditional studio flash unit is what makes studio flash units so valuable.

    As far as the accessory mount or "fit", as the British call it: the Bowens or Bowens S-type (same thing), 3-lug bayonet mount is the most common among third-party studio flash makers, and is a great choice, IMHO.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Messages:
    3,117
    Likes Received:
    781
    Location:
    Western New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The more I learn about the nuisances of lighting the more I feel like I’m throwing lights up and getting lucky.

    This is the *one* area of photography where I would love to take a weekend workshop taught by a very experienced professional.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,230
    Likes Received:
    15,104
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Older books have some good instruction on how to use various types of lights: parabolic metal AKA pan; scrims or panels; umbrellas; softboxes;

    https://www.amazon.com/Techniques-P...qid=1514142268&sr=1-3&keywords=gary bernstein

    https://www.amazon.com/Techniques-B...qid=1514142268&sr=1-6&keywords=gary bernstein

    https://www.amazon.com/How-Photogra...hotograph women beautifully J. Barry O'Roarke

    These three books were written by very experienced professionals, and were written mostly before the advent of the four-flexible-poles-and-ripstop-nylon-softbox, and I own these titles and still highly recommend them l. I learned a huge amount from these three titles. Learning to light using smaller metal-reflector sources (5- to 22-inch) and smaller umbrellas (30-inchers or so) made it easy to transition to using larger, softer light sources.

    I worked at a studio where our main and fill lights were identical-sized 16-inch, 50-degree, deep parabolic reflectors with diffuser covers, and the background lighting was done with a flood-to-spot Photogenic brand flash head designed specifically as the best-possible background lighting device. Clamshell reflector, removable, and a variable-beamspread angle possibility. Great modeling lamp in it too!
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. TiCoyote

    TiCoyote TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    New England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    Thanks, Derrell. I ordered the "Best of Photographic Lighting" book. I appreciate the recommendation.
     

Share This Page