Going digital like everyone else!!

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by SassyFrass, Jan 16, 2004.

  1. SassyFrass

    SassyFrass TPF Noob!

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    Greetings from good ole Kansas!

    I am planning on buying the Canon 10D and am unsure of which lense is the best for the money. I shoot mainly portraits of children on location but am converting the garage into a studio. Size of studio will be 22'X22'. I would like to purchase a good all around lense that can be used for many situations. I currently have a ProSpec (anyone heard of this?) AF 75-300 f/5.6, Tamron AF 28-200 f5.6, and the standard Canon 35-80.

    I would prefer to purchase a Canon lense. Since I shoot mainly portraits I am leaning towards a zoom of some kind. Maybe the new Canon 28-200/3.5-5.6USM (retails from $300-350).

    Do I even need a new lense? Another option would be to buy the camera, check out the lenses I have and then decide. This would be the frugal choice, but not as fun!

    Any thoughts would be appreciated!
     
  2. tr0gd0o0r

    tr0gd0o0r TPF Noob!

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    Well the general rule of thumb for portraiture is to try and get a good distance from your subject so you don't scare them. but in a 22x22 size room, I'd wonder how much of a zoom would be effective. I.E. a 300mm focal length may not be able to get more than head or shoulders. I would say stick with what you have, they'll probably work out wonderfully for you. And at least wait to see what focal length you're gonna need.
     
  3. seanarmenta

    seanarmenta TPF Noob!

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    i work out of a 15 x 20 room, and i use my 80-200 2.8 as my main lens.

    for that size, you could do great work with a 85 or 135. if you can afford faster glass, the better. personally, i'd much rather work with one expensive, fast lens than several cheaper, slower lenses. it's all about image quality.

    stuff taken in my little workspace with my 80-200:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    this one taken with a 28-80:

    [​IMG]


    sean
     
  4. SassyFrass

    SassyFrass TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the info. Sean the pics. are great. It's nice to know it's possible to get excellent photos in a confined space.
     
  5. motcon

    motcon TPF Noob!

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    *snicker*
     

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