Graduate ND Filters

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by meg27, Oct 5, 2005.

  1. meg27

    meg27 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Chichester
    In addition to my other post - "Beautifulu sky came out dull!!", I have just been reading article about ND filters and feel it may be the answer to my problem. However, the author was talking bout two types of ND filter, circular and rectangular. He said rectangular was the way forward, but i'm having real trouble visualising exactly what a rectangular filter is??!!!
    Any clues?
     
  2. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Messages:
    668
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  3. meg27

    meg27 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Chichester
    Yeah, thats sounds about right. What is best do you think? Screw on circular or something like this?
     
  4. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Messages:
    668
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    well, although I have not converted to Cokin yet, I intend to.

    Currently I have 3 lenses. Two are 54mm diameter and one is 62mm diameter. I have bought about 6 or 7 filters for the 54mm lenses but now finding myself needing to buy the same filters all over again for the 62mm.

    I have already done some pricing and for about $30-$35 I can get the filter holder and adapters for all of my lenses. Once I have done that then I only need to buy one of each kind of filter and it will work on whatever lenses I have now, and conceivably any lens I buy in the future.

    Based on that I am convinced that Cokin is the way for me to go but I hope that someone with some experience with the system will chime in here and let us know their thoughts on how this system works.
     
  5. meg27

    meg27 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Chichester
    So you would need to buy an adapter for each lens, but once that is done you only need one set of filters. Hmmm, sounds like a better idea.

    They do look quite cumbersome though, don't you think? My camera is only a Pentax MZ-5N, do you think it would look silly?

    Also have you read my other thread? Do you think an Graduated ND is the answer to my prob?
     
  6. micatlady

    micatlady TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2005
    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Mayville, MI
    I have round screw type UV filters for all my lenses, mostly just to protect them. I'm really hard on my equipment and spend quite a bit of time outdoors so the protection is necessary. For all my other filter needs I invested in the Cokin P series, the A's are cheaper but I can't use them on my larger lenses (and future dream lenses). I really find that they were and still are worth every cent I've spent on them, plus I'm not limited by thread size. The graduated ND filters are cool for those shots you have really bright and really dark areas, like sunsets.
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Possibly the reasoning behind the author's recommendation of rectangular, graduated neutral density filters is that they can be adjusted up or down depending on where the horizon meets the sky in your composition. While with a circular, screw on filter the graduated ND usually stops right in the middle, which could be problematic if you don't want to place your horizon there.
     
  8. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    846
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Delavan, Wisconsin, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    ksmattfish is right on the money as for the reason for a rectangular filter. I've got the Cokin "P" filter setup for my lenses and got Singh Ray graduated ND filters.

    They work quite well and as he pointed out it is much easier to work with then the screw in type. You can possition the transition line where you want after you compose the shot in your viewfinder. It's very rare that you want the transistion in the exact center of your composition. Usually you want the horizon either in approximately the bottom or top 1/3 of the shot.

    Another good reason for the Cokin filters is that you just have to get adaptors for each lens size you have and then the filters work on all your lenses. You don't have to have a separate set for each lens size.

    Besides Singh Ray, I believe Lee also makes filters for the "P" system. There are probably other manufacturer that make them as well. They give you lots of flexibility.
     
  9. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Messages:
    668
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    That is an excellent point about being able to move them up or down to adjust the area that is being blocked. Another great reason to invest in cokin, and thanks for the tip on P vs. A. When I finally do invest I think I should look at P as well so I can make sure and be ready for any lens I may decide to buy.
     
  10. Meysha

    Meysha still being picky Vicky

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    4,152
    Likes Received:
    58
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Why don't you just buy a step-up ring? It'll probably cost you $5-$10 and it saves you buying all new filters.
     
  11. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Messages:
    668
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    as I understand it that would work best if I had bought 62mm filters then I could step them down to 54 without vignetting(sp?). Going the other way would likely cause some issues since I would be using small filters on a larger lens with an adapter.

    I may be wrong on that though?
     
  12. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    You are right. If you are planning on using the step ring strategy, you need to start out with the biggest filters you'll ever need.

    The best way to avoid needing to buy too many filters is don't have too many lenses, or stick to models with the same filter diameter. ;)

    I have a 72mm filter set I bought for a 28-200 zoom that I never use anymore. But I use some of the filters on some of my medium format lenses with step rings. It can be done, but it's sort of a pain in the butt. It looks funny, possibly more fragile. Extra unneeded glass surface to help cause lens flare. Regular lenshood/accessories for the lens no longer fits, etc... I'll mess with it for filters I don't use often, but if it's a filter I use a lot I just buy a new one. The only filters that are really must-have for me are a polarizer and a red or orange.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
cheap graduate nd filter
,

circular or rectangular nd filter

,
graduate circular filter
,

graduate nd

,
graduatend
,
recommendations for grad nd filters