Graduated Neutral Density Filters and "macro kit" questions

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Abby Rose, Feb 17, 2010.

  1. Abby Rose

    Abby Rose TPF Noob!

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    Hi, I'm new here and new to photography. :) I want to learn!

    I just learned about graduated nd filters. Since I love to take pictures with sky in them, these filters seem like something I might use. Would you recommend one for a beginner? Or are they something more advanced than a beginner would need, or want? Also, I have been combing Google for ones that fit a Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-H50, just in case I decide to buy one, but I havent found anything. I have found regular nd filters for them though, which I am eyeing... :)

    And while I was looking for these filters, I found something called a "10x Close-Up Macro Lens Kit for Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H9 DSC-H7 DSC-H50"... is something like this necessary for really really macro pictures? I can get pretty close with what I have. And the "kit" is only about $25, which makes me sort of suspicious.

    For those who might not know, the sony H50 is not a DSLR. I knew when I got it that there were conversion lenses for it, but I'm not sure I understand what that's all about. Why have other lenses for a fixed lens camera? Is this something that's recommended, to get lenses for a camera like this? This isn't something I need to worry about now, of course, but it would be nice to understand. :)

    I think that's all I wanted to ask, for now. :)
     
  2. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Graduated ND filters
    What you say is true the use of these for landscape and skyscape shots is quite wide, especailly when you have a bright sky and a very dark ground and still want to expose both correctly. However there are two sorts of these filter. The first is a screw in type which fits onto the end of your lens and these will have the point of graduation (ie the line where it starts) going right through the middle of the lens image - every single time. This is of course limiting because it means you have to have half your image of the sky and half of the ground (for example) rather than having one being the more dominant element.
    The other kind are the sort that fit into filter holders (like Cokin). These are better as because they are sheets that fit into a filter holder you can move the filter up and down to change the point of graduation to fit the scene.

    As for if they are availble for your camera my guess is that most screw in types will be on the cheapy side - whilst filter holders are unlikley to support attaching to your camera. However you might be able to rig something up with a filter holder approach.


    Macro
    There are some inexpensive macro filters (correctly called diopters) on the market and some of the best are Raynox macro adaptors.
    DCR-250 Super Macro conversion lens for D-SLR camera
    The DCR250 (+8times diopter) is one of their models and if you look around their site there are other options from the less powerfull DCR150 to the 5320 set though the 5320 is a more expensive option.

    Certainly the macro addons are something you can play around with and on a camera like yours they should perform well since the point and shoot camera types give a good depth of field in macro work (actually better than DSLRs because th point and shoots have a smaller sensor size)
     
  3. Abby Rose

    Abby Rose TPF Noob!

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    Ah, thank you Overread. And these Raynox macro adapters, might they fit my camera? I couldn't find anything definite on the site. My camera has an adapter ring that itself screws on, and then other things in turn can screw onto that. I have a petal lens hood that screws on, and thats all for the moment. :) I imagine that any other accessories I might get would attach here as well.
     
  4. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The filter itself has a 43mm mounting screw thread (like your screw in hood and other filters) however the universal clip that comes with it can mount to 52-67mm threads - it just clips in and out as needed.

    Somewhere you camera should have a note as to what the filter screw thread size is (filter size) and that should be in mm and denots the size of your mounting point. If its smaller though there are stepping rings thatyou can get which will let you mount larger (or smaller) filters to the thread. These are very cheap and you can get many through ebay.
     
  5. Abby Rose

    Abby Rose TPF Noob!

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    Thank you. :) After some more practice in macro, I think I might look into purchasing one of these.
     

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