HDR and clarity with stitching

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by JBWilson, Jun 18, 2010.

  1. JBWilson

    JBWilson TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, ME
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    So I have been thinking about trying to get into HDR. I got the trial version of Photomatix. I'm wondering how I can get a little better clarity when the three exposures are stitched together. I feel in looking at my three originals, the foucs was better. I used a tripod and had it securely mounted. Any suggestions?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    9,027
    Likes Received:
    2,171
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    HDR's are tough to keep perfectly together. Even you pressing the shutter can change the composition slightly enough to make it not exactly the same. Tripod, mirror up, and a remote release cord does the trick.
     
  3. JG_Coleman

    JG_Coleman No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Messages:
    336
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Wolcott, Connecticut, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    D-B-J is right... most successful HDRs require that you take extra caution to preserve an identical frame for each exposure... and just pressing the shutter will usually wiggle the camera enough to throw off the cripsness of your results. In fact, I prefer not even to use the remote release cord, just in case it causes the slightest degree of shake. Instead, I use a shutter-release remote control to fire the shots. I don't touch the camera a single time while firing all three bracketed exposures.

    You can even take this a bit further by enabling the "shutter delay mode" on your camera (my Nikon D5000 has this mode, I assume other DSLRs do also), which will give the camera a moment to settle after the shutter has lifted. This will go that extra bit further to ensure perfectly identical shots with your bracketed exposure.
     
  4. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    38,255
    Likes Received:
    5,011
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    It also helps if you image a scene that can actually benefit from HDR.

    The guitars isn't one of those, unless for some reason you wanted additional detail in the shadows behind the guitars.
     
  5. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    9,027
    Likes Received:
    2,171
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Ive noticed that you are very picky about people "misusing" hdr.
     
  6. JBWilson

    JBWilson TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, ME
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks for the info. on remote triggering. Probably best to go that route in the long run.

    As far as guitars, I agree. Just wanted to try it out on something quick inside while hanging around last night...they beat the microwave ;)
     
  7. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Why not? I mean I could tell you that in order to adjust the white balance of an image you need to open it in MS paint and then manually adjust and repaint each individual pixel. Will you then say it's misused? Of course.

    Photomatix is a program designed from the ground up with a focus on HIGH dynamic range. If your dynamic range neatly fits into camera anyway then there's not point and there's also potential for the results to be worse by taking 3 shots and importing them into photomatix.

    At the very least they are worse now because it says photomatix all over it.
    That and the image looks completely flat with absolutely no interesting contrast what so ever.
     
  8. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,263
    Likes Received:
    189
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    :thumbup: +
     
  9. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    38,255
    Likes Received:
    5,011
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm not picky. There are just a lot of people who don't understand what HDR is really about.

    I'm just pointing out they used the wrong technique, which is just as bad as using the wrong lens, the wrong DOF, the wrong shutter speed, or the wrong ISO.

    People learn from their mistakes. They can't learn, if they don't know a mistake has been made.
     
  10. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,263
    Likes Received:
    189
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    ++++ :thumbup:
     
  11. irfan

    irfan TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2010
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Columbus Ohio
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    might be a poor subject choice, but its still fine to practice technique on. I shoot all the time around my house, testing things out, taking pics of diet coke cans. doesn't matter that its not the ideal situation or poor composition, im just trying techniques out like he is.
     
  12. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    That's fine with many aspects but not with others.

    You can't properly practice HDR photography on an image with no dynamic range to begin with. It's like practising painting a car, by painting an unfinished sheet of chipboard.

    At the very least the elements of the required technique must be there. You should paint a sheet of metal laying around the house, and in the case of our HDR image if you're just practising, put the guitars next to a window so you actually get some bright lights. Otherwise you may potentially be wasting time. You may think you've finally got it sussed, go out and take a photo of the sunset only to find that the result has nasty halos, too much contrast, etc.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

clarity photography beyond the camera

,

horizon picture clarity hdr