Healing brush in high contrast areas

Discussion in 'Graphics Programs and Photo Gallery' started by FidelCastrovich, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. FidelCastrovich

    FidelCastrovich TPF Noob!

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    Hello all,
    I really like using the healing brush in PhotoShop. However, i can't bring it to do what i want if the to-be-removed spot/area is close to a different colored area. The obvious choice for patterned surfaces is to use it in "Replace" mode, but sometimes it doesn't look good.
    For example
    http://i242.photobucket.com/albums/ff180/fidelcastrovich/portraits/Picture067.jpg

    How do you clean up the hairs stuck to her forehead in this pic? If i do it, i get a black smudge, resulting from proximity to the hairs on her head.

    Thanks,
    Emil.
     
  2. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    You use the patch selection tool, where you select what the area is and than you decide where it goes. It's alot like the clone tool, except you configure the shape and it automatically blends it.

    if you hold down the patch healing tool, it's the icon with the gauze on it, not the band aid.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yup, patch tool or just go right to the clone stamp.
     
  4. FidelCastrovich

    FidelCastrovich TPF Noob!

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    Thanks guys,
    But i still get the same effect. PS tries to do a gradual transition between the hair and the forehead, and i get a strip of gradually changing color - from black to skin tone.

    :er:
     

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