Help me match Lens to Subject?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by BmDubb, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. BmDubb

    BmDubb TPF Noob!

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    Ok, so Ive come along way since getting my camera. I shoot completely manual, and really know what Aperture, Shutter Speed, ISO and other seeds need and should be used for each photo. And can about tell where each setting needs to be just by looking at what I will be shooting.

    Only thing Im still working on is the lenses.. GOD THERE ARE SO MANY! lol

    Anyways I was hoping I could get some help matching the right lens to the right subject. I will list all I have, and all I want to shoot.. And hopefully you guys can help? Thanks so much!

    CAMERA: Nikon D80

    1: 50mm 1:1.8 D AF
    2: ED 18-55 1:3.5-5.6GII AF-S DX
    3: ED 55-200mm 1:4-5.6G AF-S DX

    Heres extra filters, etc I have

    ( I have no clue as to what these are even for lol )

    1: Digital HiDef 2.0x Super Telephoto Lens
    2: 52mm 0 45x HiDef Digital Wide Lens with Macro
    3: C PL 52mm Crystal Optics
    4: UV 52mm Crystal Optics

    What I will be shooting:
    1: Nature / Scenary
    2: Wildlife ( Birds, deer, animals, etc )
    3: Portraits ( Senior photos, Weddings, family gatherings etc )
    4: City shots ( old buildings, architechture etc )


    I know this is a long topic, and alot wont read it.. I just know it wouldnt hurt to ask... To whoever helps me out... If youre ever in the area... You got a free tattoo from me :D

    Thanks alot guys

    Matt
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    For the most part, you can shoot just about anything with just about any lens. Sometimes the lens you choose is part of your personal style, sometimes the choice is just out of necessity...using whatever lens you have.

    There are some common sense things...like shooting wildlife is usually easier with a longer lens because you don't have to get as close to 'fill the frame'. A lot of people like to shoot landscapes with a shorter lens to take in a wider view.

    When shooting people, it's usually preferable to choose a longer lens, so that you are not so close to them that it causes distortion.

    When shooting buildings and architecture, you will get converging lines if you tilt the camera so that the film plane isn't square to the building. To overcome this, you can use a lens/camera with movements (Tilt & Shift).

    Looking at the lenses you have, my first impression is that you have 'consumer quality' lenses. By that I mean that they were designed to be cheap & light, rather than optimized for performance and quality. Your zoom lenses are also rather slow (small max aperture).
    For example, you could replace your 18-55mm lens with the 17-55mm F2.8.
    You could replace your 55-200mm lens with the 70-200mm F2.8 VR.
    For
     
  3. BmDubb

    BmDubb TPF Noob!

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    Thanks alot Mike.. You always pull through for me bro! lol! Yeah the lenses I have are just the ones that came with the camera. Theyre nice.. but could be better.. Eventually I will be upgrading ( Prob around christmas ). I just got a hell of a deal on this outfit.. so I couldnt pass it up.

    What about the filters. Any need / special use for them?
     
  4. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    What's your budget? You have everything but the UWA angle covered, but you could upgrade in quality. A Sigma 10-20 is a good investment. For telephoto, a 70-200 f/2.8 is a killer lens any way you look at it, be it Sigma, Tamron, or Nikon.
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The only one I'd use, is the Circular Polarizer. These are great for shooting outdoors under sunny skies. They are especially great for landscape photos, especially when you have blue skies and fluffy white clouds.
     
  6. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Grad ND can be usefull for landscap shots as well.
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I believe he was asking specifically about these.
     
  8. Kegger

    Kegger TPF Noob!

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    I throw UV filters on all my glass, just to protect the front element. But that's in debate amongst photogs. Personal preference really. The CPL is a nice touch and comes in handy to cut glare, especially useful when shooting through glass.

    As for the lenses, I second the upgrade. To cover the WA, the Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 is an outstanding piece of glass for the money. Tack sharp, and very well built. And also invest in a 70-200 2.8, as it will help flatten portraits, taking the distortion out.
     

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