Help on Black and white.

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Royster, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. Royster

    Royster TPF Noob!

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    I would like to start taking pictures with black and white film, please give me advice on how to "learn" taking B&W the right way. How does one start? Which kind of film should i use on daytime and which for night/low light? portrait and landscape? Which filters are usefull for me on those application. Which film brand do you recommend i use? Sorry for cramming too much questions here, Just eager to learn.

    Thanks in advance. :hail:
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    There is no one right way. Get some film and start shooting. An ISO 400 film is usually a good place to start; you will find many fans of Kodak Tri-X or Ilford HP5+, but there are plenty of other good films. Pick up "Black and White Photography" by Henry Horenstein. It's an easy read, and a great source of info.
     
  3. sbalsama

    sbalsama TPF Noob!

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    Just remember you have to develop it yourself, but I'm sure you know that...

    I say pick up some Kodak Tri-X, just to keep it simple and mainstream. Branch off to Ilford or others once you get a grasp of what film is and its differences.

    Good luck!
     
  4. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    While in the states Tri-X would be the most common, since he's in England wouldn't Ilford be the mainstream choice? :)
     
  5. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    Expose for the shadows. Keep them 2 stops from the neutral grey and they'll still hold detail with "normal" development.

    Familiarize yourself with the zone system.

    For film... I only started a month ago, and I use Agfa APX 100 and 400... Never tried anything different, cause Kodak tri-x or ilford is tri-x the price. Works good so far.
     
  6. Jeff/fotog

    Jeff/fotog TPF Noob!

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    First, get the Ansel Adams Camera and Lens books and read every page. Then read the Daybooks of Edward Weston. It ain't about lenses and film necessarily; it's about the passion.

    You are only at the beginning of a very long journey. Good luck!

    www.jefferyraymond.com
     
  7. sbalsama

    sbalsama TPF Noob!

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    Fair enough, Matt :p
     
  8. Royster

    Royster TPF Noob!

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    Thankyou all for the input. I guess reading more about it is a safe and sure way. I asked my GF to buy me some films when she went out shopping and she brought back a couple of B&W ISO 125 Illfords. Can someone tell me this films characteristics. Is this film limited to daytime use?

    All the best.
     
  9. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    It sounds like you've got FP4+, in which case if I remember correctly it's good with contrast, and should be fine as a general film for learning with. And if you are learning, personally I would recommend shooting a couple of rolls of film just in daytime - maybe making notes on the light conditions, aperture setting and shutter speed for each shot (if you have time) - and getting them processed to see if you can learn from what worked and what didn't. For lower light photography I would recommend you use a faster speed film just as you would with colour - 400 should do it. Hope some of this helps, but I'm really a newbie myself so I could be completely wrong about everything :) Anyway, good luck!
     
  10. Royster

    Royster TPF Noob!

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    I will be experimenting my 2 rolls of fp4 with my friends this weekend, forecast says the weather will be lovely, so my films will be fine.

    Id like to Invite everyone in the London/ m25 Area to come to lampton park, Hounslow Central in Middlesex on sunday, 17th of July for the Annual Euro-Filipino community Barrio Fiesta. Join and expirience the friendly people the exotic food and watch the artist from the Islands perform.

    For those interested, email me if you want to meet my friends and have a "native guide" with you.

    Thanks again all!! :D
     

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