HELP: Taking Photos @ Concerts

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by thc_guy, Dec 27, 2008.

  1. thc_guy

    thc_guy TPF Noob!

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    I have two questions - I figure someone knows the answer to these from thier experience taking photos as shows when the people are moving on stage, lights are flashing, it's dark, etc.
    1.) If your going to use a SCENE mode on your camera which one should it be? Someone told me beach...don't understand that but I'll try it. Any other suggestions you've had that was successful?

    2.) I can adjust all the setting manually on my camera (ISO, white blance, etc). If I was to adjust various setting to shoot concert photography what settings would I change and what should I change them too?
    Thanks in advance for your help. Hopefully your advice will help me and tons of other photographers on this board.
     
  2. AlexColeman

    AlexColeman TPF Noob!

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    1 dont use a scene mode, use program
    2 program, and see if you need a different setting.
     
  3. thc_guy

    thc_guy TPF Noob!

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    Okay - so how should I manually change my settings (ISO, etc)?

    What should go up? What should go down?

    HELP!
     
  4. tsaraleksi

    tsaraleksi TPF Noob!

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    The big question is what camera are you using? I'm going to give advice like you're using a dSLR, sorry if it's not relevant. Concert photography is tough, period. Depending on the venue it can either be a bit easier or harder. If you're shooting local bands in bars or similar places, it may be impossible to get a clean shot without some kind of lighting (I have shot a band at f/2.8, ISO12,800!). Assuming you are dealing with a bit better circumstances, the best advice is to open your aperture all the way up to as low a number as possible, set your shutter speed at something like 1/125, and see what ISO you need to get a good exposure. If you are working with better light, then you might be able to up the shutter speed, because it's going to be too slow to stop a lot of movement. The shutter is what I'd up first, if you can, then drop the ISO, then think about changing the aperture.
     
  5. thc_guy

    thc_guy TPF Noob!

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    SO I have a nice camera and that one takes great pics at concerts already.

    My issue is my point and shoot. HOW CAN I ADJUST THE FOLLOWING SETTINGS TO TAKE BETTER CONCERT PHOTOS (low light, flashing stage lights, moving artists, etc)

    ISO (choices are 64 up to 3200)

    WHITE BALANCE (choices are daylight, tungsten, flouresent, open shade)

    EXPOSURE METERING (choices are center weight, mutli pattern, center spot)

    EXPOSURE COMPENSATION (choices +3 all the way to -.3)

    LONG TIME EXPOSURE (none, .5 sec. 1 sec, 2 sec, 4 sec, 8 sec)

    AF CONTROL (single AF, continous AF)

    AF ZONE (multi zon, center zone)

    SHARPNESS (low, normal, high)
     
  6. Jurence

    Jurence TPF Noob!

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    You have a point and shoot, that is your problem.


    ISO: Think of it as the volume on a boom box set to a station that is a bit staticy. You need to turn it up when it is quiet (Dark) but the static is louder (noise)

    Aperture: You probably can't adjust this on a point and shoot. Smaller aperture = more light

    Shutter speed: Unless you have a tripod, it will be pointless to turn this up. The longer your shutter speed = the longer the picture will be exposed to light = more light. The longer your exposed = the more motion blur (especailly without a tripod, it will look horrible).

    Crank the ISO up to 600 max, imo. Other than that, you can't do much to not ruin the photos
     
  7. reg

    reg TPF Noob!

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    IMO - you're going to have a hard time getting there from here.
     
  8. jwsciontc

    jwsciontc TPF Noob!

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    ???? then why don't you just use the good one??
     
  9. thc_guy

    thc_guy TPF Noob!

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    I take my digital SLR out when I am shooting professionally for the magazine I own. I use it when I am working and in the photo pit, etc. -- with that one I don't even have to do anything. I could be talking to someone and shooting photos without looking and they'll turn out so amazing it's unbelieveable.

    When I am just out partying, dancing, drinking, etc I don't wanna lug around a huge $1500 camera. I'd lose it, spill on it, drop it, or something.

    I just want some cool looking photos to remember the night with.

    -----------

    That is why I don't use the nicer one all the time.
     
  10. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are TPF Noob!

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    Alright, I gotta jump in here...

    ...You shoot professionally for a magazine you own, and you're asking questions about 'scene' mode and which settings to change to improve concert shots (which you already "shoot professionally")?

    While talking to someone and without looking, no less.

    Huh?!?

    Jon
     

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