HELP! Trouble with slow shutter speed in afternoon daylight!

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by smackitsakic, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. smackitsakic

    smackitsakic TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2010
    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Saskatchewan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Greetings!

    I am still quite new to photography (had my first DSLR for just over a month now) and wanted to take some pictures of some massive windmills near my city of residence.

    My wife and I made the 20 minute journey to the windmills. My intention was to capture these windmills using a slow shutter speed to give a motion effect for the windmills with a still background.

    Anyway, I slowed down the shutter speed to 2 seconds, set the aperture to f-32 and the ISO to 100, the biggest settings my equipment could handle. The images came out incredibly over-exposed, to the point where the images were white and nothing but white. The only thing I could do to have the images correctly exposed was accelerate the shutter speed, which defeated the purpose of me trying to shoot these windmills in motion.

    What did I do wrong and what I can do differently next time? Any help for this new photographer would be greatly appreciated!!
     
  2. m.stevenson

    m.stevenson TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lander, WY
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    unless the wind mills are going super slow I would defiantly speed up your shutter speed. I will limit the amount of motion but 2 sec of a good moving wind mill is quite a bit of movement and less time will defiantly capture what you are looking for.
     
  3. jensgt

    jensgt TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    Bowie, MD
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    2 seconds is way long. You can capture motion at a much quicker shutter speed than that. Only other option would be adding a ND filter to darken the scene allowing the slower shutter speed but 2 seconds is probably still too long. You can see motion at speeds like 1/60.

    Also you did not mention using a tripod...hopefully you were.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,822
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    It sounds like you completely ignored your camera's light meter. Hence, the extreme overexposure. You can't just pick the settings you want, you need to be mindful of the exposure...and in this case, there was too much light to shoot that slow...even with your smallest aperture and lowest ISO.

    The easiest thing to do, would be to shoot at a different time of day, when it's not so bright...but you could also add ND filters, which block some light, allowing you to get an exposure with a longer shutter speed.
     
  5. smackitsakic

    smackitsakic TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2010
    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Saskatchewan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    At the risk of sounding totally stupid, which i'm willing to take being that i'm new to this...what the heck is my camera's light meter?

    By the way, love the avatar Big Mike - stellar Oil jersey!
     
  6. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2008
    Messages:
    2,925
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Your light meter tells you if your exposure is correct or not when using manual mode.

    If you want to take long exposures in the daylight you'll need a ND (dark) filter on your lens--think of it like a pair of sunglasses for your camera.
     
  7. Gaerek

    Gaerek TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 2, 2009
    Messages:
    1,341
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Sitka, AK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Try this:

    Put your camera on a tripod. Compose your shot. Switch to Av mode, and set your aperture to the smallest possible. Then turn your ISO the lowest possible. What shutter does the camera recommend. If it's faster than say 1/30, you probably won't get the effect you want. You'll need to shoot at a darker time of day, or pick up a Neutral Density filter (as others have said). No need to shoot manual for this.
     
  8. Dominantly

    Dominantly TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    3,032
    Likes Received:
    165
    Location:
    San Diego, CA (RB)
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    VVVV Down there is a link with photos of it.
     
  9. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Messages:
    11,443
    Likes Received:
    2,100
    Location:
    Wichita, Kansas, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Buy this [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Exposure-Photographs-Digital-Updated/dp/0817463003"]book[/ame] and read it. When you understand the triad that goes into exposure, these situations will not happen.
     
  10. Tee

    Tee Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,941
    Likes Received:
    606
    Location:
    The burbs of Philly
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    *Not meaning to threadjack*

    Thank you for that tip, Gaerek. I ran into the same problem as the OP this weekend while trying to slow-mo water in a fountain (camera kept saying "subject too bright", I was trying to ignore it like a toothache :D).

    Quick question: is there an unwritten (or written) rule about avoiding certain times of the day? I've read a few posts that suggest avoiding high noon. Aside from a ND filter, are there any other tricks when coming back at an earlier/ later time in the day isn't possible?

    gryphon: thanks for the link. Book ordered.:thumbup:
     
  11. burstintoflame81

    burstintoflame81 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2009
    Messages:
    729
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arizona
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    .....and when you buy an ND filter. Understanding doesn't magically make your camera operate differently. If you want a long exposure in super bright mid day light, you will need an ND filter. There isn't some magic setting on your camera that will change that. It acts as a sunglass basically. The camera can still see the image, but you can open and allow light in more slowly so that you can capture motion without blinding your camera sensor. Often used to get that swirly magical look to flowing water.

    That doesn't mean you shouldn't learn exposure though. If you knew exposure, you would have known how to fix your problem already so it would have saved you a lot of time :)
     
  12. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    38,255
    Likes Received:
    5,010
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You'll find a description of it and it's location in your camera by reading the users manual that should have been included with your camera.

    If you don't have the users manual you can download one at the web site of the company that made your camera.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
how to shoot slow shutter speed in daylight
,
how to take slow shutter speed photos in daylight
,
how to use slow shutter speed in daylight
,
long shutter speed daytime white photo
,
slow shutter daylight
,

slow shutter speed in daylight

,
slow shutter speed photography in daylight
,
slow shutter speed too much light
,
slow shutter speeds in daylight
,
using slow shutter speed in daylight