Help with settings/post processing?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by bahandi, May 3, 2008.

  1. bahandi

    bahandi TPF Noob!

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    Hey guys, new to the forum and new to the concept of manual settings. Took this pic as i was leaving my grandma's apartment... didn't really have time to check the settings:

    [​IMG]

    WB: sunny
    ISO: 400
    1/125
    f5

    i wanted the plastic flowers to stand out, or at least not be as dark in the picture. I believe i chose spot metering? as well. The option with the dot in the middle.. lol.

    I have an Olympus 550 uz, if that will help with suggestions and critique.

    Also, seeing as i'm just learning everything about photography, i would prefer not to do too much post processing.

    So what can i do?

    ps. I apologize if this is the wrong place to post this
     
  2. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Here's a rundown on exposure.

    Shutter speed. How long your shutter is open to allow light to expose the film.
    Aperture. The hole that the light travels through to get there.
    Film speed. A film's sensitivity to light.
    Film latitude. Film's ability to record highlights and shadows.

    (I'm talking film cause that's what I shoot though it applies to dig as well).

    Film speed is relatively easy. Use low speed ratings for good lighting and still subjects. Higher speeds for low light and moving subjects.

    Shutter speed. A faster shutter speed will freeze action. Slower shutter speeds will show motion. You should try to never photograph hand held at a shutter speed that is less than the focal length of the lens you are using. Example: 50mm - 1/60 S/S. This will help keep motion and blurring from occuring, even from your body's own movement.

    Aperture. This is the adjustable hole that light comes through. The larger the hole (smaller number) will allow faster shutter speeds and also bring down your depth of focus (the space in front of the camera where portions of your subject are anywhere form reasonable to sharp focus). Smaller aperture (bigger number) will require slower shutter speeds for proper exposure but will greatly increase your depth of field, good for scenic/landscapes.

    Film latitude. Different types of films will record more detail on either side of an average exposure. Color slide film will easily pick up a total of three stops of exposure (a stop is one incriment of exposure adjustment using either shutter speed or aperture). Color negative film and digital sensors about five stops. Black and white negative film, SEVEN STOPS. (Digital sensors with the camera in black and white mode still around five stops, camera limitation).

    NOW, to the question at hand. The flowers do stand out due to composition, but they do not POP. They are too dark, probably due to going with your on camera light meter which also takes the light from outside the window and tries to fit that into proper exposure. See how it is very light but you can still make it out. Your camera guessed that was what you wanted to do and took ALL light in front of the camera and averaged it out, darkening your flowers. Try to meter the flowers only next time, exclude as much of the UBER bright background so as not to be distracting. Maybe set it up on a tripod and set your exposure with a large aperture so that only the flowers and little else is in focus. Read 'Understanding Exposure' by Bryan Peterson and 'The Negative' by Ansel Adams to really get some good info on the nuts and bolts of exposure and have fun.
     
  3. bahandi

    bahandi TPF Noob!

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    whoa... forgot about this.. lol... thanks for all that advice.

    a flash would probably have helped too, would it not?
     

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